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Policy Alternatives for a Return to Full Employment in Spain

Author

Listed:
  • David Rosnick
  • Mark Weisbrot

Abstract

With Spain’s official unemployment rate at 26 percent, and the economy projected to contract by 1.3 percent this year, it is difficult to make the case for continued austerity that could push a barely growing economy back into recession. Yet the government is committed to further fiscal tightening, on the grounds that it has no choice. This paper will show that there are various feasible alternatives that can restore full employment to Spain by 2018, as well as other possibilities that could accomplish this goal even sooner.ssion that began in 2008, much of it is a result of policy choices, including a decrease in social spending.

Suggested Citation

  • David Rosnick & Mark Weisbrot, 2013. "Policy Alternatives for a Return to Full Employment in Spain," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2013-17, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  • Handle: RePEc:epo:papers:2013-17
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    File URL: http://www.cepr.net/documents/Spain-2013-11.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Uxó González, Jorge & Álvarez, Ignacio & Febrero, Eladio, 2017. "Fiscal space on the eurozone periphery: The case of Spain," IPE Working Papers 84/2017, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
    2. David Rosnick & Mark Weisbrot, 2015. "Has Austerity Worked in Spain?," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2015-27, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    3. Juan R. Cuadrado-Roura & Andrés Maroto, 2016. "Unbalanced regional resilience to the economic crisis in Spain: a tale of specialisation and productivity," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 9(1), pages 153-178.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spain; employment; austerity;

    JEL classification:

    • E - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • E66 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General Outlook and Conditions
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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