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Taxpayer Beliefs about Farm Income and Preferences for Farm Policy

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  • Brenna D. Ellison
  • Jayson L. Lusk
  • Brian C. Briggeman

Abstract

One voice that is commonly overlooked in debates about farm policy and payment limitations is that of the average tax payer. Surprisingly little research has been done on what taxpayers believe about farms and what they prefer regarding farm policy. Our sample of taxpayers believes that farmers are doing well financially, and most people actually overestimate farmers' incomes. In addition, we found strong preferences for subsidizing small family farms over very large family farms, even though most of the people in our sample believe small family farms earn a higher level of income than their own household. A large majority of our sample supports government subsidies for farmers, primarily because people believe it ensures a secure food supply. Copyright 2010, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Brenna D. Ellison & Jayson L. Lusk & Brian C. Briggeman, 2010. "Taxpayer Beliefs about Farm Income and Preferences for Farm Policy," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 32(2), pages 338-354.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:apecpp:v:32:y:2010:i:2:p:338-354
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/aepp/ppp014
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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Mittenzwei & Stefan Mann & Karen Refsgaard & Valborg Kvakkestad, 2016. "Hot cognition in agricultural policy preferences in Norway?," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(1), pages 61-71, March.
    2. Christian Bredemeier, 2014. "Imperfect information and the Meltzer-Richard hypothesis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 159(3), pages 561-576, June.
    3. Lusk, Jayson L., 2012. "The political ideology of food," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 530-542.
    4. Williams, John & McSweeney, Peter & Salmon, Robert, 2014. "Australian Farm Investment: Domestic and Overseas Issues," Australasian Agribusiness Perspectives 234408, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment.
    5. Moritz Bosbach & Ornella Wanda Maietta & Hannah Marquardt, 2015. "Domestic Food Purchase Bias: A Cross-Country Case Study of Germany, Italy and Serbia," CSEF Working Papers 409, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    6. Clas Eriksson, 2011. "Home bias in preferences and the political economics of agricultural protection," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 92(1), pages 5-23.
    7. Busch, Gesa & Spiller, Achim, 2016. "Farmer share and fair distribution in food chains from a consumer’s perspective," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 149-158.
    8. Moon, Wanki & Saldias, Gabriel Pino, 2013. "Public Preferences about Agricultural Protectionism in the US," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150718, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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