IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ntj/journl/v71y2018i3p547-588.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Effects of Penalty Information on Tax Compliance: Evidence from a New Zealand Field Experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Norman Gemmell
  • Marisa Ratto

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of late payment penalties on tax compliance based on an experiment involving New Zealand goods and service tax (GST) late payers using a late payment model in which the probability of enforcement, rather than detection, is central. A field experiment involving a specific compliance intervention, allows us to examine how taxpayers respond when given different penalty information, examining effects on both taxpayers' stated compliance intentions and subsequently observed behavior. Results suggest that differences in penalty information given to taxpayers and reductions in penalty rates affect compliance stated intentions but actual behavior is generally unresponsive.

Suggested Citation

  • Norman Gemmell & Marisa Ratto, 2018. "The Effects of Penalty Information on Tax Compliance: Evidence from a New Zealand Field Experiment," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 71(3), pages 547-588, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:71:y:2018:i:3:p:547-588
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/71/3/ntj-v71n03p547-588-Effects-of-Penalty-Information-on-Tax-Compliance.html
    Download Restriction: Access to most recent volumes (current and past two years) is restricted to subscribers and members of the National Tax Association.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Raj Chetty & Emmanuel Saez, 2013. "Teaching the Tax Code: Earnings Responses to an Experiment with EITC Recipients," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 1-31, January.
    2. Malik, Arun S. & Schwab, Robert M., 1991. "The economics of tax amnesties," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 29-49, October.
    3. Alm, James & Beck, William, 1993. "Tax Amnesties and Compliance in the Long Run: A Time Series Analysis," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 46(1), pages 53-60, March.
    4. E Gahramanov, 2009. "The Theoretical Analysis of Income Tax Evasion Revisited," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 14(1), pages 35-42, March.
    5. Allingham, Michael G. & Sandmo, Agnar, 1972. "Income tax evasion: a theoretical analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3-4), pages 323-338, November.
    6. Alm, James & Jackson, Betty & McKee, Michael J., 1992. "Estimating the Determinants of Taxpayer Compliance with Experimental Data," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 45(1), pages 107-14, March.
    7. James Alm & William Beck, 1990. "Tax Amnesties and Tax Revenues," Public Finance Review, , vol. 18(4), pages 433-453, October.
    8. Julio López-Laborda & Fernando Rodrigo, 2003. "Tax Amnesties and Income Tax Compliance: The Case of Spain," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 24(1), pages 73-96, March.
    9. Alm, James & Beck, William, 1993. "Tax Amnesties and Compliance in the Long Run: A Time Series Analysis," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 46(1), pages 53-60, March.
    10. Raj Chetty, 2012. "Bounds on Elasticities With Optimization Frictions: A Synthesis of Micro and Macro Evidence on Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 80(3), pages 969-1018, May.
    11. Alm, James & McClelland, Gary H. & Schulze, William D., 1992. "Why do people pay taxes?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 21-38, June.
    12. Alm, James & Jackson, Betty & McKee, Michael J., 1992. "Estimating the Determinants of Taxpayer Compliance With Experimental Data," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 45(1), pages 107-114, March.
    13. Sandmo, Agnar, 2005. "The Theory of Tax Evasion: A Retrospective View," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 58(4), pages 643-663, December.
    14. Joel Slemrod, 2007. "Cheating Ourselves: The Economics of Tax Evasion," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 25-48, Winter.
    15. Stella, Peter, 1991. "An economic analysis of tax amnesties," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 383-400, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Pomeranz, Dina D. & Vila-Belda, José, 2019. "Taking State-Capacity Research to the Field: Insights from Collaborations with Tax Authorities," CEPR Discussion Papers 13688, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. repec:pal:palcom:v:5:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1057_s41599-019-0247-4 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:71:y:2018:i:3:p:547-588. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sally Sztrecska). General contact details of provider: https://www.ntanet.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.