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Who Does Not Have a Bank Account in Hungary Today?

Author

Listed:
  • Dániel Horn

    (Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

  • Kiss Hubert János

    (Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

Abstract

Based on a representative sample, the study examines how regional variables and variables related to settlement type as well as demographic (gender, age), social (qualifications, income) and labour market characteristics (unemployment, public sector) and individual preferences (risk-taking and patience) are correlated with the fact that the respondent has a bank account or bank card or not. The authors find that having a bank account or bank card is not influenced by whether someone works in the public sector or not or by the individual’s gender, while the effect of the preferences depends on the financial service. The impact of the other variables (age, education, income, unemployment) is in line with expectations and is significant separately as well as if they are taken into account simultaneously. The analysis shows that regional impacts and ones related to settlement type are also significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Dániel Horn & Kiss Hubert János, 2019. "Who Does Not Have a Bank Account in Hungary Today?," Financial and Economic Review, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary), vol. 18(4), pages 35-54.
  • Handle: RePEc:mnb:finrev:v:18:y:2019:i:4:p:35-54
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Bradford & Charles Courtemanche & Garth Heutel & Patrick McAlvanah & Christopher Ruhm, 2017. "Time preferences and consumer behavior," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 55(2), pages 119-145, December.
    2. Lasse Brune & Xavier Giné & Jessica Goldberg & Dean Yang, 2016. "Facilitating Savings for Agriculture: Field Experimental Evidence from Malawi," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(2), pages 187-220.
    3. Anikó Turján & Éva Divéki & Éva Keszy-Harmath & Gergely Kóczán & Kristóf Takács, 2011. "Nothing is free: a survey of the social cost of the main payment instruments in Hungary," MNB Occasional Papers 2011/93, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    bank account; bank card; risk-taking; financial inclusion; socio-demographic characteristics; patience;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • G4 - Financial Economics - - Behavioral Finance

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