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Impact of globalization on productivity of u.s. Manufacturing labor 1988-2003

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  • Abdullah M. Khan

    (Assistant Professor School of Business,Claflin University)

Abstract

This paper explores the impact of globalization on some determinants of per worker labor productivity in U.S. manufacturing industries. Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), and trade liberalization are examined as two main drivers of globalization in this study. The estimation result suggests that globalization has negatively impacted per worker productivity across small, medium, and high skill workers in U.S. manufacturing industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdullah M. Khan, 2012. "Impact of globalization on productivity of u.s. Manufacturing labor 1988-2003," International Journal of Business and Social Research, MIR Center for Socio-Economic Research, vol. 2(5), pages 203-218, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:mir:mirbus:v:2:y:2012:i:5:p:203-218
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    File URL: http://thejournalofbusiness.org/index.php/site/article/view/224/224
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Wolfgang Keller & Stephen R. Yeaple, 2009. "Multinational Enterprises, International Trade, and Productivity Growth: Firm-Level Evidence from the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(4), pages 821-831, November.
    8. Wheeler, Christopher H., 2006. "Productivity and the geographic concentration of industry: The role of plant scale," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 313-330, May.
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    10. David L. Rigby & J¸rgen Essletzbichler, 2002. "Agglomeration economies and productivity differences in US cities," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(4), pages 407-432, October.
    11. Lourens Broersma & Jan Oosterhaven, 2009. "Regional Labor Productivity In The Netherlands: Evidence Of Agglomeration And Congestion Effects," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 483-511.
    12. Belorgey, Nicolas & Lecat, Remy & Maury, Tristan-Pierre, 2006. "Determinants of productivity per employee: An empirical estimation using panel data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 153-157, May.
    13. Acemoglu, Daron & Autor, David, 2011. "Skills, Tasks and Technologies: Implications for Employment and Earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
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