IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/mig/journl/v12y2015i2p103-112.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Blind spots of traditional poverty measurement: the case of migrants

Author

Listed:
  • Christos Koutsampelas

    () (Economics Research Centre, University of Cyprus, PO. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia, Cyprus.)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to examine two blind-spots of poverty measurement with application to the study of migrant poverty. The first regards the definition of income (in particular the consideration of non-cash income components in the definition of income) and the second regards the methodological treatment of a migrant group with very particular characteristics (those working as domestic workers). Both issues have eluded the attention of many applied researchers and practitioners. The microdata of the 2009 Cyprus Family Expenditure Survey are used to illustrate the importance of the points made above as well as to put forth potential solutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Christos Koutsampelas, 2015. "Blind spots of traditional poverty measurement: the case of migrants," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 12(2), pages 13-27, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:mig:journl:v:12:y:2015:i:2:p:103-112
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://journal.tplondon.com/index.php/ml/article/viewFile/379/383
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Taryn Ann Galloway & Rolf Aaberge, 2005. "Assimilation effects on poverty among immigrants in Norway," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 691-718, November.
    2. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-766, May.
    3. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    4. Frick, Joachim R. & Grabka, Markus M. & Smeeding, Timothy M. & Tsakloglou, Panos, 2010. "Distributional effects of imputed rents in five European countries," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 167-179, September.
    5. Jorgen Hansen & Roger Wahlberg, 2009. "Poverty and its persistence: a comparison of natives and immigrants in Sweden," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 105-132, June.
    6. Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo & José-Ignacio Antón, 2011. "From Rags to Riches? Immigration and Poverty in Spain," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(5), pages 661-676, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mig:journl:v:12:y:2015:i:2:p:103-112. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (I. Sirkeci). General contact details of provider: https://www.tplondon.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.