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A Decomposition of the Personal Income Tax Changes in Italy: 1995-2000


  • Francesca Gastaldi
  • Paolo Liberati
  • Chiara Rapallini


The effects of personal income tax changes are usually analyzed by comparing the inequality of income distributions before and after the tax policy change on a fixed pretax income distribution. This constant-population methodology aims at isolating the "pure" redistributive effect of the tax legislation. On the basis of the OECD's 1987 analysis, this paper proposes a methodology to disentangle the pure effect of tax changes from the influence of other nontax factors when the pretax income distribution is not fixed. For the Italian case, it is shown that the additional redistributive outcome displayed by changes of tax laws between 1995 and 2000 is only one-fourth of the total change of the redistributive impact in the same period and is outweighed by the effect of inflationary fiscal drag.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesca Gastaldi & Paolo Liberati & Chiara Rapallini, 2008. "A Decomposition of the Personal Income Tax Changes in Italy: 1995-2000," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 64(1), pages 87-114, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:mhr:finarc:urn:sici:0015-2218(200803)64:1_87:adotpi_2.0.tx_2-p
    DOI: 10.1628/001522108X312087

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Maria Rosaria Marino & Chiara Rapallini, 2003. "La composizione familiare e l�imposta sul reddito delle persone fisiche: un�analisi degli effetti redistributivi e alcune considerazioni sul benessere sociale," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 477, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Kakwani, Nanok C, 1977. "Measurement of Tax Progressivity: An International Comparison," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 87(345), pages 71-80, March.
    3. Francesca Gastaldi & Paolo Liberati, 2005. "The Personal Income Tax in Italy: Why Does It Change?," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 64(2-3), pages 159-188, November.
    4. Aronson, J Richard & Johnson, Paul & Lambert, Peter J, 1994. "Redistributive Effects and Unequal Income Tax Treatment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(423), pages 262-270, March.
    5. Immervoll, Herwig, 2000. "The impact of inflation on income tax and social insurance contributions in Europe," EUROMOD Working Papers EM2/00, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Doris Prammer & Lukas Reiss, 2015. "Impact of Inflation on Fiscal Aggregates in Austria," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 27-41.

    More about this item


    Redistribution; personal income tax; Italy; decomposition; fiscal drag;

    JEL classification:

    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies


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