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Pure Theory of the Federal Funds Rate

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  • Homburg Stefan

    () (School of Economics and Management, Leibniz University Hannover, Germany)

Abstract

The effective federal funds rate is determined in a competitive interbank market, while the target federal funds rate represents a policy variable. This paper proposes a theory of the determination of the effective funds rate. According to the main result, the latter is a Lagrange multiplier that vanishes if excess reserves emerge. This is exactly what happened in the United States in September 2008. A final section considers interest on reserves.

Suggested Citation

  • Homburg Stefan, 2016. "Pure Theory of the Federal Funds Rate," Review of Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 67(3), pages 285-296, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:lus:reveco:v:67:y:2016:i:3:p:285-296:n:5
    DOI: 10.1515/roe-2017-0002
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1515/roe-2017-0002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jane E. Ihrig & Ellen E. Meade & Gretchen C. Weinbach, 2015. "Rewriting Monetary Policy 101: What's the Fed's Preferred Post-Crisis Approach to Raising Interest Rates?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 177-198, Fall.
    2. Hamilton, James D, 1996. "The Daily Market for Federal Funds," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(1), pages 26-56, February.
    3. Rudebusch, Glenn D., 1995. "Federal Reserve interest rate targeting, rational expectations, and the term structure," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 245-274, April.
    4. Goda, Thomas & Lysandrou, Photis & Stewart, Chris, 2013. "The contribution of US bond demand to the US bond yield conundrum of 2004–2007: An empirical investigation," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 113-136.
    5. William Poole, 1968. "Commercial Bank Reserve Management In A Stochastic Model: Implications For Monetary Policy," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 23(5), pages 769-791, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. van Riet Ad, 2019. "Monetary Policy and Unnatural Low Interest Rates: Secular Stagnation or Financial Repression?," Review of Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 70(2), pages 99-135, August.
    2. Homburg, Stefan, 2017. "A Study in Monetary Macroeconomics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198807537.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    federal funds rate; excess reserves; money multiplier; zero lower bound;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises

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