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What Caused the Great Recession?

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  • Homburg Stefan

    (School of Economics and Management, Leibniz University of Hannover, Germany)

Abstract

This paper examines five possible explanations for the Great Recession of 2008 and 2009, using data for the United States and the eurozone. Of these five hypotheses, four are not supported by the data, while the fifth appears reasonable.

Suggested Citation

  • Homburg Stefan, 2015. "What Caused the Great Recession?," Review of Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 66(1), pages 1-12, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:lus:reveco:v:66:y:2015:i:1:p:1-12
    DOI: 10.1515/roe-2015-0102
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Roger Farmer, 2012. "The Stock Market Crash of 2008 Caused the Great Recession," 2012 Meeting Papers 145, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Iyer, Rajkamal & Da-Rocha-Lopes, Samuel & Peydró, José-Luis & Schoar, Antoinette, 2014. "Interbank Liquidity Crunch and the Firm Credit Crunch: Evidence from the 2007-2009 Crisis," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 347-372.
    3. David Colander & Peter Howitt & Alan Kirman & Axel Leijonhufvud & Perry Mehrling, 2018. "Beyond DSGE Models: Toward an Empirically Based Macroeconomics," Chapters, in: How Economics Should Be Done, chapter 14, pages 212-216, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Armen A. Alchian, 1950. "Uncertainty, Evolution, and Economic Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58, pages 211-211.
    5. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin S. Eichenbaum & Mathias Trabandt, 2015. "Understanding the Great Recession," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 110-167, January.
    6. Lawrence Christiano, 2014. "Understanding the Great Recession," Annual Meeting Plenary 2014-1, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Markus K. Brunnermeier, 2009. "Deciphering the Liquidity and Credit Crunch 2007-2008," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 77-100, Winter.
    8. Peter N. Ireland, 2011. "A New Keynesian Perspective on the Great Recession," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 31-54, February.
    9. Ivashina, Victoria & Scharfstein, David, 2010. "Bank lending during the financial crisis of 2008," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(3), pages 319-338, September.
    10. Gern, Klaus-Jürgen & Jannsen, Nils, 2009. "Do we face a credit crunch?," Kiel Policy Brief 15, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial crisis; Great Recession; wealth effect; credit crunch; money demand; central bank;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets

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