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Tariffs, Trade and Economic Growth in a Institutionals Quality

Listed author(s):
  • Azam Chaudhry

    ()

    (Lahore School of Economics, Pakistan.)

This article shows how institutional quality can affect the relationship between trade and growth. Our model looks at an economy in which the export sector is a high-innovation sector. In this economy, a government that is politically threatened by innovation can use its tariff policy to block innovation and increase domestic revenues. In this case, higher tariffs reduce economic growth and the government faces a tradeoff: It can either (i) raise tariffs, collect greater rents, and increase stability; or (ii) it can reduce tariffs and increase long-run growth and instability. When the quality of a country’s institutions are reflected in the costs of increasing tariffs, it can be shown that countries with strong institutions gain more (in terms of growth) from trade than countries with weak institutions, due to the effect of institutions on trade policy. It is also possible to show that the quality of institutions in one country can spill over into another by affecting its trading partner’s growth rate of income. However, these results are reversed in the case where a country has a highly innovative domestic sector—this explains the tariff-growth paradox in which countries experience higher growth with higher tariffs in earlier stages of development, but higher growth with lower tariffs in later stages of development.

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File URL: http://121.52.153.179/JOURNAL/LJE%20Vol%2016-2%20%2823-12-11%29%20pdf/02%20Azam%20Chaudhry%20MP%20ED%20TTC%20221211.pdf
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Article provided by Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics in its journal Lahore Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 16 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (Jul-Dec)
Pages: 31-54

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Handle: RePEc:lje:journl:v:16:y:2011:i:2:p:31-54
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  1. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-351, March.
  2. Hillman, Arye L, 1982. "Declining Industries and Political-Support Protectionist Motives," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(5), pages 1180-1187, December.
  3. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1995. "Institutions And Economic Performance: Cross-Country Tests Using Alternative Institutional Measures," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(3), pages 207-227, November.
  4. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1994. "Protection for Sale," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 833-850, September.
  5. O'Rourke, Kevin H, 2000. "Tariffs and Growth in the Late 19th Century," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(463), pages 456-483, April.
  6. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 1993. "Innovation and Growth in the Global Economy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262570971, January.
  7. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
  8. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
  9. Azam Chaudhry & Phillip Garner, 2007. "Do Governments Suppress Growth? Institutions, Rent-Seeking, And Innovation Blocking In A Model Of Schumpeterian Growth," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 35-52, 03.
  10. Dinopoulos, Elias & Syropoulos, Constantinos, 1997. "Tariffs and Schumpeterian growth," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-4), pages 425-452, May.
  11. Paul Segerstrom & Elias Dinopoulos, 1999. "A Schumpeterian Model of Protection and Relative Wages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 450-472, June.
  12. Azam Chaudhry & Phillip Garner, 2006. "Political Competition Between Countries and Economic Growth," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(4), pages 666-682, November.
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