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Dynamic Volatility Trading Strategies in the Currency Option Market

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  • Dajiang Guo

Abstract

The conditional volatility of foreign exchange rates can be predicted using GARCH models or implied volatility extracted from currency options. This paper investigates whether these predictions are economically meaningful in trading strategies that are designed only to trade volatility risk. First, this article provides new evidence on the issue of information content of implied volatility and GARCH volatility in forecasting future variance. In an artificial world without transaction costs both delta-neutral and straddle trading stratgies lead to significant positive profits, regardless of which volatility prediction method is used. Specifically, the agent using the Implied Stochastic Volatility Regression method (ISVR) earns larger profits than the agent using the GARCH method. Second, it suggests that the currency options market is informationally efficient. After accounting for transaction costs, which are assumed to equal one percent of option prices, observed profits are not significantly differentfrom zero in most trading strategies. Finally, these strategies offered returns have higher Sharpe ratio and lower correlation with several major asset classes. Consequently, hedge funds and institutional investors who are seeking alternative “marketneutral” investment methods can use volatility trading to improvethe risk-return profile of their portfolio through diversification. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Suggested Citation

  • Dajiang Guo, 2000. "Dynamic Volatility Trading Strategies in the Currency Option Market," Review of Derivatives Research, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 133-154, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:revdev:v:4:y:2000:i:2:p:133-154
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1009638225908
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Melino, Angelo & Turnbull, Stuart M., 1990. "Pricing foreign currency options with stochastic volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1-2), pages 239-265.
    2. Galai, Dan, 1977. "Tests of Market Efficiency of the Chicago Board Options Exchange," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(2), pages 167-197, April.
    3. Shastri, Kuldeep & Tandon, Kishore, 1986. "Valuation of Foreign Currency Options: Some Empirical Tests," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(02), pages 145-160, June.
    4. Baillie, Richard T & Bollerslev, Tim, 2002. "The Message in Daily Exchange Rates: A Conditional-Variance Tale," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 60-68, January.
    5. Wiggins, James B., 1987. "Option values under stochastic volatility: Theory and empirical estimates," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 351-372, December.
    6. Robert F. Engle & Alex Kane & Jaesun Noh, 1993. "Index-Option Pricing with Stochastic Volatility and the Value of Accurate Variance Forecasts," NBER Working Papers 4519, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Bollerslev, Tim, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 307-327, April.
    8. Hull, John & White, Alan, 1987. "Hedging the risks from writing foreign currency options," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 131-152, June.
    9. Hsieh, David A, 1989. "Modeling Heteroscedasticity in Daily Foreign-Exchange Rates," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 7(3), pages 307-317, July.
    10. Hsieh, David A., 1988. "The statistical properties of daily foreign exchange rates: 1974-1983," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 129-145, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wilkens, Sascha & Roder, Klaus, 2006. "The informational content of option-implied distributions: Evidence from the Eurex index and interest rate futures options market," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 50-74, September.
    2. Lanne, Markku & Ahoniemi, Katja, 2008. "Implied Volatility with Time-Varying Regime Probabilities," MPRA Paper 23721, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Le, Van & Zurbruegg, Ralf, 2010. "The role of trading volume in volatility forecasting," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 533-555, December.
    4. Konstantinidi, Eirini & Skiadopoulos, George & Tzagkaraki, Emilia, 2008. "Can the evolution of implied volatility be forecasted? Evidence from European and US implied volatility indices," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 2401-2411, November.
    5. Markopoulou, Chryssa & Skintzi, Vasiliki & Refenes, Apostolos, 2016. "On the predictability of model-free implied correlation," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 527-547.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    implied volatility; GARCH model; delta; straddle-hedge; trading strategies; C32;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models

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