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Fostering industry-science cooperation through public funding: differences between universities and public research centres


  • Peter Teirlinck


  • André Spithoven


This paper analyses behavioural additionality of subsidies by regional and EU framework programme public funding granted to business enterprises in terms of the ‘instalment’ of research cooperation between industry and science. Acknowledging their specificities in terms of research orientation, research scale, and management of research, the science component is divided in universities and public research centres. Drawing on firm level data provided by the OECD bi-annual business R&D surveys of 2004 and 2006 for Belgium, the main result is that funding by regional governments fosters the instalment of industry-science research cooperation. However, this positive effect is limited to the case of cooperation with public research centres (and not with universities). The prerequisite of commercialisation of research in the case of funding by regional governments could explain this. Public funding provided by the EU framework programme did not exert an impact on the instalment of industry-science cooperation, neither with universities nor with public research centres. This could be due the fact that EU funding is targeted at firms that are already cooperating and does not favour the set-up of new cooperation. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Teirlinck & André Spithoven, 2012. "Fostering industry-science cooperation through public funding: differences between universities and public research centres," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 37(5), pages 676-695, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:37:y:2012:i:5:p:676-695
    DOI: 10.1007/s10961-010-9205-4

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Defazio, Daniela & Lockett, Andy & Wright, Mike, 2009. "Funding incentives, collaborative dynamics and scientific productivity: Evidence from the EU framework program," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 293-305, March.
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    15. Tether, Bruce S. & Tajar, Abdelouahid, 2008. "Beyond industry-university links: Sourcing knowledge for innovation from consultants, private research organisations and the public science-base," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6-7), pages 1079-1095, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yiannis Spanos, 2012. "Conditionally-mediated effects of scale in collaborative R&D," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 37(5), pages 696-714, October.
    2. repec:kap:jtecht:v:42:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10961-016-9517-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Irene Ramos-Vielba & Mabel Sánchez-Barrioluengo & Richard Woolley, 2016. "Scientific research groups’ cooperation with firms and government agencies: motivations and barriers," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 558-585, June.

    More about this item


    Public funding; Research cooperation; Industry-science relations; Firm behaviour; D21; O31; O32; O38;

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy


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