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Two-sided intergenerational moral hazard, long-term care insurance, and nursing home use

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  • Christophe Courbage

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  • Peter Zweifel

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Christophe Courbage & Peter Zweifel, 2011. "Two-sided intergenerational moral hazard, long-term care insurance, and nursing home use," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 65-80, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:43:y:2011:i:1:p:65-80
    DOI: 10.1007/s11166-011-9120-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amy Finkelstein & Erzo F. P. Luttmer & Matthew J. Notowidigdo, 2009. "Approaches to Estimating the Health State Dependence of the Utility Function," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 116-121, May.
    2. Sloan, Frank A & Norton, Edward C, 1997. "Adverse Selection, Bequests, Crowding Out, and Private Demand for Insurance: Evidence from the Long-Term Care Insurance Market," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 201-219, December.
    3. Mellor, Jennifer M., 2001. "Long-term care and nursing home coverage: are adult children substitutes for insurance policies?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 527-547, July.
    4. Brown, Jeffrey R. & Finkelstein, Amy, 2007. "Why is the market for long-term care insurance so small?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(10), pages 1967-1991, November.
    5. Jeffrey R. Brown & Amy Finkelstein, 2008. "The Interaction of Public and Private Insurance: Medicaid and the Long-Term Care Insurance Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 1083-1102, June.
    6. Zweifel, Peter & Struwe, Wolfram, 1996. "Long-Term Care Insurance and Bequests as Instruments for Shaping Intergenerational Relationships," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 65-76, January.
    7. Evans, William N & Viscusi, W Kip, 1991. "Estimation of State-Dependent Utility Functions Using Survey Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(1), pages 94-104, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Joan Costa‐Font & Christophe Courbage, 2015. "Crowding Out of Long‐Term Care Insurance: Evidence from European Expectations Data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24, pages 74-88, March.
    2. De Donder, Philippe & Pestieau, Pierre, 2011. "Private, social and self insurance for longterm care: a political economy analysis," IDEI Working Papers 719, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse, revised Jun 2014.
    3. Christophe Courbage & David Crainich, 2012. "More on the optimal demand for long-term care insurance," Working Papers 2012-ECO-17, IESEG School of Management.
    4. De Donder, Philippe & Pestieau, Pierre, 2013. "Private, social and self-insurance for long-term care in the presence of family help: A political economy analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 9587, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Zweifel Peter & Courbage Christophe, 2016. "Long-Term Care: Is There Crowding Out of Informal Care, Private Insurance as Well as Saving?," Asia-Pacific Journal of Risk and Insurance, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 107-132, January.
    6. Courbage, Christophe & Eeckhoudt, Louis, 2012. "On insuring and caring for parents’ long-term care needs," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 842-850.
    7. Jean-Marc Bascans & Christophe Courbage & Cornel Oros, 2017. "Means-tested public support and the interaction between long-term care insurance and informal care," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 113-133, June.
    8. Christophe Courbage & Peter Zweifel, 2015. "Double Crowding-Out Effects of Means-Tested Public Provision for Long-Term Care," Risks, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(1), pages 1-16, February.
    9. repec:bla:glopol:v:8:y:2017:i::p:38-45 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Masaya Yasuoka, 2017. "Elderly Care Service in an Aging Society," Discussion Paper Series 168, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Oct 2017.
    11. Atsushi Miyake & Masaya Yasuoka, 2016. "Which Should the Government Subsidize: Child Care or Elderly Care?," Discussion Paper Series 144, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Jun 2016.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Long-term care insurance; Intergenerational moral hazard; Nursing home care; D19; G22; J14;

    JEL classification:

    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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