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Elderly Care Service in an Aging Society

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  • Masaya Yasuoka

    () (School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University)

Abstract

An increase in life expectancy brings about an aging society, necessitating increasing demand for elderly care services. This paper presents an examination of how an aging society affects the demand for elderly care services and the labor market for elderly care services. Related reports of the literature describe that an aging society raises the share of labor dedicated to elderly care services. However, considering a closed economy in which saving affects the capital stock, an aging society does not always raise the share of labor allocated for elderly care services as derived by the related literature. This paper presents an examination of how the labor share and wage inequality between the final goods sector and elderly care sector are determined. In addition, this paper presents an examination of whether the subsidy for elderly care service increases demand for elderly care services, or not.

Suggested Citation

  • Masaya Yasuoka, 2017. "Elderly Care Service in an Aging Society," Discussion Paper Series 168, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised Oct 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:kgu:wpaper:168
    as

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    File URL: http://192.218.163.163/RePEc/pdf/kgdp168.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chiara Canta & Pierre Pestieau & Emmanuel Thibault, 2016. "Long-term care and capital accumulation: the impact of the State, the market and the family," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 61(4), pages 755-785, April.
    2. Helmuth Cremer & Pierre Pestieau, 2014. "Social long-term care insurance and redistribution," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 21(6), pages 955-974, December.
    3. Ken-ichi Hashimoto & Ken Tabata, 2010. "Population aging, health care, and growth," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 571-593, March.
    4. Henry Ohlsson & Michael Lundholm, 1998. "Wages, taxes and publicly provided day care," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 11(2), pages 185-204.
    5. Korn Evelyn & Wrede Matthias, 2013. "Working Mums and Informal Care Givers: The Anticipation Effect," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(2), pages 473-498, July.
    6. CREMER, Helmuth & PESTIEAU, Pierre & PONTHIERE, Grégory, 2012. "The economics of long-term care: a survey," CORE Discussion Papers 2012030, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
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    12. David Byrne & Michelle S. Goeree & Bridget Hiedemann & Steven Stern, 2009. "Formal Home Health Care, Informal Care, And Family Decision Making," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1205-1242, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Aging society; Elderly care service; Labor mobility; Two-sector model;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General

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