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Accounting for economic evolution: Fitness and the population method

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  • John Metcalfe

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Suggested Citation

  • John Metcalfe, 2008. "Accounting for economic evolution: Fitness and the population method," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 23-49, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbioec:v:10:y:2008:i:1:p:23-49
    DOI: 10.1007/s10818-008-9029-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Metcalfe, J S, 2001. "Institutions and Progress," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 561-586, September.
    2. Wendy Carlin & Jonathan Haskel & Paul Seabright, 2001. "Understanding ‘The Essential Fact about Capitalism’: Markets, Competition and Creative Destruction," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 175(1), pages 67-84, January.
    3. Kurt Dopfer & John Foster & Jason Potts, 2004. "Micro-meso-macro," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 263-279, July.
    4. John Foster & J. Stanley Metcalfe (ed.), 2001. "Frontiers of Evolutionary Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2234.
    5. Thorbjørn Knudsen, 2004. "General selection theory and economic evolution: The Price equation and the replicator/interactor distinction," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 147-173.
    6. Richard R. Nelson & Sidney G. Winter, 2002. "Evolutionary Theorizing in Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 23-46, Spring.
    7. Geoffrey Hodgson & Thorbjørn Knudsen, 2004. "The firm as an interactor: firms as vehicles for habits and routines," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 281-307, July.
    8. Mark Doms & Eric J. Bartelsman, 2000. "Understanding Productivity: Lessons from Longitudinal Microdata," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(3), pages 569-594, September.
    9. John Stanley Metcalfe & Ronnie Ramlogan, 2006. "Creative Destruction and the Measurement of Productivity Change," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 97(5), pages 373-397.
    10. Cohen, Michael D, et al, 1996. "Routines and Other Recurring Action Patterns of Organizations: Contemporary Research Issues," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 653-698.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Janet Landa, 2008. "The bioeconomics of homogeneous middleman groups as adaptive units: Theory and empirical evidence viewed from a group selection framework," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 259-278, December.
    2. J. Stan Metcalfe & John Foster, 2010. "Evolutionary Growth Theory," Chapters,in: Handbook of Alternative Theories of Economic Growth, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. repec:elg:eechap:15485_11 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Benjamin David, 2014. "Contribution of ICT on Labor Market Polarization: an Evolutionary Approach," EconomiX Working Papers 2014-25, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    5. Giulio Bottazzi & Pietro Dindo, 2013. "Evolution and market behavior in economics and finance: introduction to the special issue," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 507-512, July.
    6. Ulrich Witt, 2013. "The Future of Evolutionary Economics: Why Modalities Matter," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2013-09, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    7. David Haas, 2016. "The evolutionary traverse: a causal analysis," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(5), pages 1173-1193, December.
    8. Stan Metcalfe, 2012. "J.A. Schumpeter and the Theory of Economic Evolution (One Hundred Years beyond the Theory of Economic Development)," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2012-13, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    9. Jacob Holm, 2014. "The significance of structural transformation to productivity growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(5), pages 1009-1036, November.
    10. Richard Sosis & Paul Swartwout, 2008. "Demonstrating group selection: A comment on Janet Landa’s ‘The bioeconomics of homogenous middleman groups as adaptive units’," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 297-301, December.
    11. A. Rainer & R. Strohmaier, 2014. "Modeling the diffusion of general purpose technologies in an evolutionary multi-sector framework," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 425-444, August.
    12. Jack Vromen, 2011. "Heterogeneous Economic Evolution: A Different View on Darwinizing Evolutionary Economics," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology, chapter 15 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Kaldasch, Joachim, 2014. "Evolutionary Model of Moore’s Law," MPRA Paper 54397, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Jean-François Mercure, 2015. "An age structured demographic theory of technological change," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 25(4), pages 787-820, September.
    15. Uwe Cantner & Simone Vannuccini, 2017. "Innovation and lock-in," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Innovation and Knowledge Creation, chapter 11, pages 165-181 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    16. Haas, David & Rainer, Andreas, 2014. "Diffusion in a simple classical model. Micro decisions and macro outcomes," Centro Sraffa Working Papers CSWP6, Centro di Ricerche e Documentazione "Piero Sraffa".
    17. Jacob Rubæk Holm & Esben Sloth Andersen & J. Stanley Metcalfe, 2016. "Confounded, augmented and constrained replicator dynamics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 803-822, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic evolution; Economic fitness; Fisher-Price accounting; C00; L10; O10; O40;

    JEL classification:

    • C00 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - General
    • L10 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - General
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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