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The Sisyphus Syndrome in Health Revisited

  • Peter Zweifel

    ()

  • Lukas Steinmann
  • Patrick Eugster
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    Health care may be similar to Sisyphus work: When the task is about to be completed, work has to start all over again. To see the analogy, consider an initial decision to allocate more resources to health. The likely consequence is an increased number of survivors, who will exert additional demand for health care. With more resources allocated to health, the cycle starts over again. The objective of this paper is to improve on earlier research that failed to find evidence of a Sisyphus syndrome in industrialized countries. This time, there are signs of such a cycle, which however seems to have faded away recently. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10754-005-1864-6
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics.

    Volume (Year): 5 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 127-145

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:5:y:2005:i:2:p:127-145
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=106603

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    1. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Jonsson, Bengt, 1991. "Conversion factor instability in international comparisons of health care expenditure," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 227-234, July.
    2. Peter Zweifel & Stefan Felder & Markus Meiers, 1999. "Ageing of population and health care expenditure: a red herring?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(6), pages 485-496.
    3. Frech, H. E. III & Miller, Richard D. Jr., 1996. "The Productivity of Health Care and Pharmaceuticals: An International Comparison," University of California at Los Angeles, Research Program in Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy qt0d90459k, Research Program in Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy, UCLA.
    4. Christensen, Laurits R & Jorgenson, Dale W & Lau, Lawrence J, 1973. "Transcendental Logarithmic Production Frontiers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 55(1), pages 28-45, February.
    5. Pedro Pita Barros, 1998. "The black box of health care expenditure growth determinants," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(6), pages 533-544.
    6. Manishi Prasad & Peter Wahlqvist & Rich Shikiar & Ya-Chen Tina Shih, 2004. "A," PharmacoEconomics, Springer Healthcare | Adis, vol. 22(4), pages 225-244.
    7. Charles T. Stewart Jr., 1971. "Allocation of Resources to Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 6(1), pages 103-122.
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