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What happened to savings during the financial crisis—a dynamic panel analysis of Asian-5 countries

  • Marwan Thanoon
  • Ahmad Baharumshah

    ()

This article examines the determinants of saving rates in five Asian (Asian-5; Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand South Korea and the Philippines) countries over the 1970–2000 period. The focus is on the relationship between savings rates and foreign capital inflows before and in the financial crises. Major findings from the dynamic panel regressions are: (i) foreign savings depresses domestic savings ratio in the short as well as in the long run and the offset appears to be larger in the crisis period; (ii) real interest has a small negative effect on savings in the short and long run; (iii) the demographic factor explains a large portion of the long run trends but not the short-term fluctuations in savings rates; and (iv) high savings ratios in the countries studied is linked to the export sector. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2005

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10644-006-9006-9
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Economic Change and Restructuring.

Volume (Year): 38 (2005)
Issue (Month): 3 (December)
Pages: 257-275

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Handle: RePEc:kap:ecopln:v:38:y:2005:i:3:p:257-275
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