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The Development of Social Simulation as Reflected in the First Ten Years of JASSS: a Citation and Co-Citation Analysis

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Abstract

Social simulation is often described as a multidisciplinary and fast-moving field. This can make it difficult to obtain an overview of the field both for contributing researchers and for outsiders who are interested in social simulation. The Journal for Artificial Societies and Social Simulation (JASSS) completing its tenth year provides a good opportunity to take stock of what happened over this time period. First, we use citation analysis to identify the most influential publications and to verify characteristics of social simulation such as its multidisciplinary nature. Then, we perform a co-citation analysis to visualize the intellectual structure of social simulation and its development. Overall, the analysis shows social simulation both in its early stage and during its first steps towards becoming a more differentiated discipline.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthias Meyer & Iris Lorscheid & Klaus G. Troitzsch, 2009. "The Development of Social Simulation as Reflected in the First Ten Years of JASSS: a Citation and Co-Citation Analysis," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 12(4), pages 1-12.
  • Handle: RePEc:jas:jasssj:2009-47-2
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    File URL: http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/12/4/12/12.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Akira Namatame & Thomas Lux & Robert Axtell, 2006. "Welcome to JEIC," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 1(1), pages 1-3, May.
    2. Nigel Gilbert, 1997. "A Simulation of the Structure of Academic Science," Sociological Research Online, Sociological Research Online, vol. 2(2), pages 1-3.
    3. John Scott & Scott Moss, 2002. "A European Social Simulation Association," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 5(3), pages 1-9.
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    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Davide Secchi & Raffaello Seri, 2017. "Controlling for false negatives in agent-based models: a review of power analysis in organizational research," Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 94-121, March.
    2. Martin Neumann, 2010. "Norm Internalisation in Human and Artificial Intelligence," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 13(1), pages 1-12.
    3. Nuno David & José Castro Caldas & Helder Coelho, 2010. "Epistemological Perspectives on Simulation III," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 13(1), pages 1-14.
    4. Sina Hocke & Matthias Meyer & Iris Lorscheid, 2015. "Improving simulation model analysis and communication via design of experiment principles: an example from the simulation-based design of cost accounting systems," Journal of Management Control: Zeitschrift für Planung und Unternehmenssteuerung, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 131-155, August.
    5. Cathérine Grisar & Matthias Meyer, 2016. "Use of simulation in controlling research: a systematic literature review for German-speaking countries," Management Review Quarterly, Springer;Vienna University of Economics and Business, vol. 66(2), pages 117-157, April.
    6. repec:spr:comaot:v:23:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10588-016-9224-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. David Anzola & Peter Barbrook-Johnson & Juan I. Cano, 0. "Self-organization and social science," Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-37.
    8. Raasch, Christina & Lee, Viktor & Spaeth, Sebastian & Herstatt, Cornelius, 2013. "The rise and fall of interdisciplinary research: The case of open source innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 1138-1151.
    9. Schubring, Sandra & Lorscheid, Iris & Meyer, Matthias & Ringle, Christian M., 2016. "The PLS agent: Predictive modeling with PLS-SEM and agent-based simulation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(10), pages 4604-4612.
    10. repec:spr:scient:v:105:y:2015:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-015-1712-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Stephan Leitner & Friederike Wall, 2015. "Simulation-based research in management accounting and control: an illustrative overview," Journal of Management Control: Zeitschrift für Planung und Unternehmenssteuerung, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 105-129, August.

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