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The Evolution of Science Policy and Innovation Studies

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  • Ben Martin

    (SPRU, University of Sussex)

Abstract

This article examines the origins and evolution of the field of science policy and innovation studies (SPIS). Like other studies in this Special Issue, it seeks to systematically identify the key intellectual developments in the field over the last 50 years by analysing the publications that have been highly cited by other researchers. The analysis reveals how the emerging field of SPIS drew upon a growing range of disciplines in the late 1950s and 1960s, and how the relationship with these disciplines evolved over time. Around the mid-1980s, substantial parts of SPIS started to coalesce into a more coherent field centred on the adoption of an evolutionary (or neo-Schumpeterian) economics framework, an interactive model of the innovation process, and (a little later) the concept of ‘systems of innovation’ and the resource-based view of the firm. The article concludes with a discussion of whether SPIS is perhaps in the early stages of becoming a discipline.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Ben Martin, 2008. "The Evolution of Science Policy and Innovation Studies," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20080828, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tik:inowpp:20080828
    Note: The research reported here was begun at SPRU but completed while I was working at the Centre for Advanced Study in the project led by Jan Fagerberg on ‘Understanding innovation’. I am grateful to the Centre for the facilities and support provided. The paper has benefited substantially from discussions with Giovanni Dosi, Jan Fagerberg, Benoit Godin, Hariolf Grupp, Magnus Gulbrandsen, Bengt-Åke Lundvall, Stan Metcalfe, David Mowery, Paul Nightingale, Koson Sapprasert and Jim Utterback. Any comments, criticisms, suggestions etc. would be much appreciated. However, the paper is not to be quoted without permission.
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O35 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Social Innovation
    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School

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