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Migration and female genital mutilation

Listed author(s):
  • Sandrine Mesplé-Somps

    (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), Université Paris-Dauphine, PSL Research University, LEDa, UMR DIAL, France)

More than 100 million women and girls in the world have had their genitals cut for cultural, religious, or other non-medical reasons. Even though international organizations condemn female genital mutilation (FGM), or cutting, as a violation of human rights, and most nations have banned it, it remains prevalent in many African countries, and is slow to decline. This persistence raises questions about the effectiveness of international and national laws prohibiting the practice as well as the potential role of returning migrants in changing embedded cultural norms. Does migration change migrants’ opinions and attitudes to this custom? If so, do they transfer the new norms to their origin countries?

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Article provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its journal IZA World of Labor.

Volume (Year): (2016)
Issue (Month): (August)
Pages: 282-282

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Handle: RePEc:iza:izawol:journl:y:2016:n:282
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Mahmoud, Toman Omar & Rapoport, Hillel & Steinmayr, Andreas & Trebesch, Christoph, 2014. "The Effect of Labor Migration on the Diffusion of Democracy: Evidence from a Former Soviet Republic," IZA Discussion Papers 7980, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Idrissa Diabate & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps, 2014. "Female genital mutilation and migration in Mali. Do migrants transfer social norms?," Working Papers DT/2014/16, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
  3. Simone Bertoli & Francesca Marchetta, 2012. "Bringing It All Back Home Return migration and fertility choices," Working Papers halshs-00659292, HAL.
  4. Spilimbergo, Antonio, 2006. "Democracy and Foreign Education," CEPR Discussion Papers 5934, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. repec:dau:papers:123456789/12585 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Christopher J. Coyne* & Rachel L. Coyne, 2014. "The identity economics of female genital mutilation," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 48(2), pages 137-152, April-Jun.
  7. Chauvet, Lisa & Mercier, Marion, 2014. "Do return migrants transfer political norms to their origin country? Evidence from Mali," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 630-651.
  8. Pfutze, Tobias, 2012. "Does migration promote democratization? Evidence from the Mexican transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 159-175.
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