IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/inm/ormnsc/v50y2004i2p268-279.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Multiperson Tournaments: An Experimental Examination

Author

Listed:
  • Alannah Orrison

    () (Department of Economics, Saddleback College, Mission Viejo, California 92692)

  • Andrew Schotter

    () (Department of Economics, New York University, New York, New York 10003-6687)

  • Keith Weigelt

    () (Department of Management, The Wharton School, 2000 Steinberg Hall---Dietrich Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6370)

Abstract

Modern hierarchical organizations, like corporations, must motivate agents to work hard. Given their pyramid structure, it is not surprising that one commonly used motivator is the promotion tournament. In such tournaments, agents compete to advance to positions at higher organizational levels. Though these tournaments are common, little research has empirically looked at the interface of organizational structure and tournament design. This paper aims to take a step in filling this void by comparing the performance of various tournament designs using controlled laboratory techniques.

Suggested Citation

  • Alannah Orrison & Andrew Schotter & Keith Weigelt, 2004. "Multiperson Tournaments: An Experimental Examination," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 50(2), pages 268-279, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:50:y:2004:i:2:p:268-279
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.1030.0128
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lazear, Edward P & Rosen, Sherwin, 1981. "Rank-Order Tournaments as Optimum Labor Contracts," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 841-864, October.
    2. O'Keeffe, Mary & Viscusi, W Kip & Zeckhauser, Richard J, 1984. "Economic Contests: Comparative Reward Schemes," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(1), pages 27-56, January.
    3. Baker, George & Gibbs, Michael & Holmstrom, Bengt, 1993. "Hierarchies and compensation: A case study," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 366-378, April.
    4. Bull, Clive & Schotter, Andrew & Weigelt, Keith, 1987. "Tournaments and Piece Rates: An Experimental Study," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(1), pages 1-33, February.
    5. George Baker & Michael Gibbs & Bengt Holmstrom, 1994. "The Internal Economics of the Firm: Evidence from Personnel Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(4), pages 881-919.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    tournaments; economic experiments; incentives;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:50:y:2004:i:2:p:268-279. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mirko Janc). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/inforea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.