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Fiscal Space and Public Spending on Children in Burkina Faso1
[Burkina Faso. Classification-JEL: I32, D58, C50, O55]

Listed author(s):
  • John Cockburn

    ()

    (Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP) and Université Laval Pavillon J.-A.-DeSève, 1025 avenue des Sciences-Humaines Québec (Québec) G1V 0A6, CANADA)

  • Hélène Maisonnave

    ()

    (EDEHN, Department of Economics, Université du Havre 25 rue Philippe Lebon, 76600 Le Havre, FRANCE and PEP network (www.pep-net.org))

  • Véronique Robichaud

    ()

    (Independent researcher and Resource person - PEP network, Université Laval Pavillon J.-A.-DeSève, 1025 avenue des Sciences-Humaines Address Québec (Québec) G1V 0A6, CANADA)

  • Luca Tiberti

    ()

    (Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP) and Université Laval Pavillon J.-A.-DeSève, 1025 avenue des Sciences-Humaines Address Québec (Québec) G1V 0A6, CANADA)

Despite experiencing high growth rates in recent decades, Burkina Faso remains a poor country. Poverty among children is particularly worrying, as it has long term (and often irreversible) effects on individuals. Furthermore, it can be transmitted from one generation to the next and significantly reduce economic growth. To address this issue requires fiscal and budgetary policies supporting health, education and improving the household economy. At the same time, the Burkina Faso’s budget deficit has grown in recent years as a result of various crises, which have hit the country. This study uses a macro-micro model to evaluate three different policy interventions aimed at reducing child poverty in Burkina Faso under given budgetary constraints. The results indicate that increased public education spending helps raise school participation and promotion rates. This increases the supply and education level of skilled workers, leading to a reduced incidence and depth of both monetary and caloric poverty. A cash transfer scenario reduces child poverty even more.

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File URL: http://microsimulation.org/IJM/V9_1/IJM_9_1_2016_Cockburn.pdf
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Article provided by International Microsimulation Association in its journal International Journal of Microsimulation.

Volume (Year): 9 (2016)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 5-23

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Handle: RePEc:ijm:journl:v:9:y:2016:i:1:p:5-23
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.microsimulation.org/ijm/

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  1. Yitzhaki, Shlomo & Slemrod, Joel, 1991. "Welfare Dominance: An Application to Commodity Taxation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(3), pages 480-496, June.
  2. Yitzhaki, Shlomo & Thirsk, Wayne, 1990. "Welfare dominance and the design of excise taxation in the Cote d'ivoire," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 1-18, July.
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  6. International Monetary Fund, 2009. "Analyzing Fiscal Space Using the MAMS Model - An Application to Burkina Faso," IMF Working Papers 09/227, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Decaluwé, Bernard & Dumont, Jean-Christophe & Savard, Luc, 2000. "Measuring Poverty and Inequality in a Computable General Equilibrium Model," Cahiers de recherche 9926, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
  8. Boureima Sawadogo & Tegawende Juliette Nana & Maimouna Hama Natama & Fidèle Bama & Emma Tapsoba & Kassoum Zerbo, 2015. "Impact de l'expansion économique et commerciale de la Chine sur la croissance et l'emploi au Burkina Faso: une analyse en équilibre général calculable," Working Papers MPIA 2015-03, PEP-MPIA.
  9. Alderman, Harold & del Ninno, Carlo, 1999. "Poverty Issues for Zero Rating VAT in South Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 8(2), pages 182-208, July.
  10. John Cockburn & Hélène Maisonnave & Véronique Robichaud & Luca Tiberti, 2013. "Fiscal Space and Public Spending on Children in Burkina Faso," Cahiers de recherche 1308, CIRPEE.
  11. Makdissi, Paul & Wodon, Quentin, 2002. "Consumption dominance curves: testing for the impact of indirect tax reforms on poverty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 227-235, April.
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