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Having Fun with Organized Kissing: A Pedagogical Note


  • Jong-Shin Wei

    (Department of International Business, Wenzao Ursuline College of Languages, Taiwan)


Harbaugh's daughter went to a French school at which every day before class, everyone in the class must kiss each other. It is easy to see that a class of 35 kids must engage in 595 kisses. Organizing the kissing for the purpose of time-saving and predicting how much time it would take are proposed in this pedagogical note inspired by the entertaining puzzle made by Harbaugh. We also illustrate how this problem-solving case study, requiring no mathematics but careful reasoning, might be incorporated in teaching undergraduate students majoring in economics or business.

Suggested Citation

  • Jong-Shin Wei, 2008. "Having Fun with Organized Kissing: A Pedagogical Note," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 7(1), pages 53-59, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijb:journl:v:7:y:2008:i:1:p:53-59

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    problem-solving; efficiency; instructional method; pairing up;

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate
    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • B40 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - General
    • C65 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Miscellaneous Mathematical Tools
    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact


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