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For richer, for poorer: the changing distribution of income in the United Kingdom, 1961-91

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  • Alissa Goodman

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Steven Webb

Abstract

This article describes the changing patterns in income inequality and real living standards over the last 30 years. Whilst it is well documented that inequality has been rising since 1979,2 there is rather less information on how the pattern of inequality changed in the period up to 1979. This study is based on an analysis of detailed information on the incomes and characteristics of around 200,000 households between 1961 and 1991, and provides for the first time ever a consistent description of trends in household incomes over such a long period.

Suggested Citation

  • Alissa Goodman & Steven Webb, 1994. "For richer, for poorer: the changing distribution of income in the United Kingdom, 1961-91," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 15(4), pages 29-62, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:15:y:1994:i:4:p:29-62
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    File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/fs/articles/goodman_nov94.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Morris, Nick & Preston, Ian, 1986. "Inequality, Poverty and the Redistribution of Income," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(4), pages 275-344, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mike Brewer & Liam Wren-Lewis, 2016. "Accounting for Changes in Income Inequality: Decomposition Analyses for the UK, 1978–2008," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(3), pages 289-322, June.
    2. Andrea Brandolini & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2007. "Inequality Patterns in Western-Type Democracies: Cross-Country Differences and Time Changes," CHILD Working Papers wp08_07, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    3. Yves G. Berger & Chris J. Skinner, 2003. "Variance estimation for a low income proportion," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 52(4), pages 457-468.
    4. Derek Leslie & Yonghao Pu, 1996. "What Caused Rising Earnings Inequality in Britain? Evidence from Time Series, 1970–1993," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 34(1), pages 111-130, March.

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