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Abalone conservation in the presence of drug use and corruption: implications for its management in South Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Edwin Muchapondwa
  • Kerri Brick
  • Martine Visser

Abstract

The illegal exploitation of wild abalone in South Africa has been escalating since 1994, despite increased enforcement, leading to collapse in some sections of its range. South Africa banned all wild abalone fishing in 2008 but controversially reopened the fishery in 2010. This paper formulates a poacher's model, taking into account the realities of the abalone terrain in South Africa - the high-value of abalone, use of recreational drugs, the prevalence of bribery, and corruption - to explore why poaching has not subsided. The paper suggests two additional measures that might help ameliorate the situation: eliminating the demand side through targeted enforcement on organised crime, and ceding the resource to the local coastal communities. However, local communities need to be empowered to deal with organised crime groups. Complementary measures to bring back community patriotism will also be needed given the tattered social fabric of the local coastal communities.

Suggested Citation

  • Edwin Muchapondwa & Kerri Brick & Martine Visser, 2014. "Abalone conservation in the presence of drug use and corruption: implications for its management in South Africa," International Journal of Sustainable Economy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 6(2), pages 201-216.
  • Handle: RePEc:ids:ijsuse:v:6:y:2014:i:2:p:201-216
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Brant Abbott, 2008. "The Economics of Endangered Species Poaching," Working Papers 2008-08, University of Victoria, Department of Economics, Resource Economics and Policy Analysis Research Group.
    3. Ehrlich, Isaac, 1973. "Participation in Illegitimate Activities: A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(3), pages 521-565, May-June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Samson Mukanjari, Edwin Muchapondwa, Precious Zikhali and Birgit Bednar-Friedl, 2012. "Evaluating the Prospects of Benefit Sharing Schemes in Protecting Mountain Gorillas in Central Africa," Working Papers 321, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    2. repec:eee:jeborg:v:141:y:2017:i:c:p:254-276 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    wild abalone; bribery; coastal communities; corruption; poaching; recreational drugs; sustainable economy; South Africa; abalone conservation; drug use; targeted enforcement; organised crime; community patriotism; social fabric.;

    JEL classification:

    • Q22 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Fishery
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics

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