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The Relationship between Intelligence, Emotional Intelligence, Personality Styles and Academic Success

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  • Marietta Kiss
  • Agnes Kotsis
  • Andras Istvan Kun

Abstract

This paper assesses the effects of general and emotional intelligence and personality preferences on academic performance. The question is examined using surveys among students in economics at the University of Debrecen, Hungary. In our examination we primarily used regression analysis. With our results we answer the question of what kind of relationship exists between the aforementioned variables and academic performance. Based on our findings we can conclude that academic performance was significantly influenced by the sex, intellectual intelligence, introvert or extrovert orientation, thinking or feeling personality preference and, in some parts of the sample, by the emotional intelligence, and perceiving or judging personality preference of the student.

Suggested Citation

  • Marietta Kiss & Agnes Kotsis & Andras Istvan Kun, 2014. "The Relationship between Intelligence, Emotional Intelligence, Personality Styles and Academic Success," Business Education and Accreditation, The Institute for Business and Finance Research, vol. 6(2), pages 23-34.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibf:beaccr:v:6:y:2014:i:2:p:23-34
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michele Pellizzari & Francesco Billari, 2012. "The younger, the better? Age-related differences in academic performance at university," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 697-739, January.
    2. Melissa Osborne & Herbert Gintis & Samuel Bowles, 2001. "The Determinants of Earnings: A Behavioral Approach," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1137-1176, December.
    3. Mary O. Borg & Stephen L. Shapiro, 1996. "Personality Type and Student Performance in Principles of Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 3-25, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Edina MOLNÁR, 2020. "The Role Of Momentary And Sustained Emotional Arousal In Advertising-Influenced And Non-Influenced Purchasing Decisions," CrossCultural Management Journal, Fundația Română pentru Inteligența Afacerii, Editorial Department, issue 1, pages 67-78, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Higher Education; Intelligence; Emotional Intelligence; Personality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate

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