IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jsusta/v8y2016i8p745-d75291.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Rural–Urban Linkages and Sustainable Regional Development: The Role of Entrepreneurs in Linking Peripheries and Centers

Author

Listed:
  • Heike Mayer

    () (Institute of Geography & Center for Regional Economic Development, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland)

  • Antoine Habersetzer

    () (Institute of Geography & Center for Regional Economic Development, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland)

  • Rahel Meili

    () (Institute of Geography & Center for Regional Economic Development, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland)

Abstract

Urban and rural areas differ in economic, social and environmental terms. Due to the diverging dynamics in urban and rural areas, the social and economic distance between them might increase in the future even more. Rural entrepreneurs with linkages to urban areas are able to bridge the rural–urban divide by accessing some of the urban features, such as knowledge and markets, while at the same time profiting from the advantages of their peripheral location. This paper highlights exploratory results from qualitative interviews with rural entrepreneurs, and we illustrate entrepreneurial linkages to urban centers. The interview data show that rural entrepreneurs with rural–urban linkages develop sensibility for core market demands and trends, they valuate rural assets, and they combine rural and urban sources of knowledge for innovation. Through their entrepreneurial activity, rural entrepreneurs with linkages to urban areas might constitute an opposite force to polarizing concentration of economic activities in cities. Hence, rural entrepreneurs with urban linkages might contribute to sustainable economic relationships between urban and rural areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Heike Mayer & Antoine Habersetzer & Rahel Meili, 2016. "Rural–Urban Linkages and Sustainable Regional Development: The Role of Entrepreneurs in Linking Peripheries and Centers," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(8), pages 1-13, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:8:p:745-:d:75291
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/8/8/745/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/8/8/745/
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roberta Capello, 2009. "Indivisibilities, Synergy And Proximity: The Need For An Integrated Approach To Agglomeration Economies," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 100(2), pages 145-159, April.
    2. Nicola Meccheri & Gianluigi Pelloni, 2006. "Rural entrepreneurs and institutional assistance: an empirical study from mountainous Italy," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(5), pages 371-392, September.
    3. Peter Nijkamp, 2003. "Entrepreneurship in a Modern Network Economy," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(4), pages 395-405.
    4. Anil Rupasingha & Yongzheng Liu & Mark Partridge, 2015. "Rural Bound: Determinants of Metro to Non-Metro Migration in the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(3), pages 680-700.
    5. Sam Youl Lee & Richard Florida & Zoltan Acs, 2004. "Creativity and Entrepreneurship: A Regional Analysis of New Firm Formation," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(8), pages 879-891.
    6. Olav Sorenson, 2003. "Social networks and industrial geography," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 13(5), pages 513-527, December.
    7. Martin Andersson & Johan P Larsson, 2016. "Local entrepreneurship clusters in cities," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 39-66.
    8. Niels Bosma & Veronique Schutjens, 2011. "Understanding regional variation in entrepreneurial activity and entrepreneurial attitude in Europe," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 47(3), pages 711-742, December.
    9. Aliye Ahu Akgün & Peter Nijkamp & Tüzin Baycan & Martijn Brons, 2010. "Embeddedness Of Entrepreneurs In Rural Areas: A Comparative Rough Set Data Analysis," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 101(5), pages 538-553, December.
    10. Todtling, Franz & Trippl, Michaela, 2005. "One size fits all?: Towards a differentiated regional innovation policy approach," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1203-1219, October.
    11. Andy Pike & Andrés Rodriguez-Pose & John Tomaney, 2008. "Local and Regional Development," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 84(2), pages 241-242, April.
    12. Schutjens, Veronique & Stam, Erik, 2003. "The Evolution and Nature of Young Firm Networks: A Longitudinal Perspective," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 115-134, September.
    13. Ali˙ye A. Akgün & Tüzi˙n Baycan-Levent & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2011. "Roles of Local and Newcomer Entrepreneurs in Rural Development: A Comparative Meta-analytic Study," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(9), pages 1207-1223, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Batabyal, Amitrajeet & Kourtit, Karima & Nijkamp, Peter, 2018. "New Technological Knowledge, Rural and Urban Agriculture, and Steady State Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 87607, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 22 Jun 2018.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    rural-urban linkages; entrepreneurship; peripheral regions;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:8:p:745-:d:75291. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team). General contact details of provider: http://www.mdpi.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.