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Identification of the Regional and Economic Contexts of Sustainable Urban Logistics Policies

Author

Listed:
  • Abel Kebede Reda

    () (Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7032, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden)

  • Girma Gebresenbet

    () (Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7032, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden)

  • Lori Tavasszy

    () (Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management (TPM), Delft University of Technology, Jaffalaan 5, 2628BX Delft, The Netherlands)

  • David Ljungberg

    () (Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7032, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden)

Abstract

Urban logistics policies have become instrumental in achieving sustainable transport systems. Developing and emerging countries still lag far behind in the implementation of such policies when compared with developed countries. This exposure gap provides an opportunity for policy transfer, but this is a complex process requiring knowledge of many contextual factors and involving multiple steps. A good understanding of those contextual factors of measures by cities may be critical for a successful transfer. Our study aimed to identify the different contexts of urban logistics measures or policies worldwide and to assess their significance for policy transferability. In this study, urban logistics measures discussed in the literature were retrieved with a systematic literature review method and then the contexts were recorded, distinguishing between economic development levels and geographical regions. The analysis revealed that the economic level and geographical location of cities both have a strong association with the type of measure implemented. Barriers and drivers were identified by assessing policy transfer between developed and developing countries. Institutional and physical barriers appeared to be highly pertinent for a range of measures, while drivers or facilitators were identified from specific problems in developing countries and the respective measures in developed countries. Thus, the analysis of contextual factors can provide a first response to the key challenges and opportunities of sustainable urban logistics policies transfer to developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Abel Kebede Reda & Girma Gebresenbet & Lori Tavasszy & David Ljungberg, 2020. "Identification of the Regional and Economic Contexts of Sustainable Urban Logistics Policies," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(20), pages 1-19, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:12:y:2020:i:20:p:8322-:d:425615
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    References listed on IDEAS

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