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Key Factors of Sustainability for Smartphones Based on Taiwanese Consumers’ Perceived Values

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  • Jui-Che Tu

    () (Graduate School of Design, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan)

  • Xiu-Yue Zhang

    () (Graduate School of Design, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan)

  • Sin-Yi Huang

    () (Graduate School of Design, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan)

Abstract

The rapid growth of smartphones over recent decades has brought a large amount of e-waste as well as an increased carbon footprint. Facing severe environmental issues, sustainable development of smartphones has become a particularly important public concern. The main aim of this study was to clarify the key factor of sustainability for smartphones based on Taiwanese consumers’ perceived values. Apple’s iPhone was taken as an example. First, key factors of perception that smartphone consumers valued the most in terms of sustainable practice were extracted through a factor analysis. Second, demographic differences related to these key factors were investigated through t -test and one-way ANOVA analyses; demographic variables were gender, age, education level, occupation, and income level. The results were as follows: (1) the key factors were “recognition”, “brand advantage”, “service quality”, “usage period”, and “perceived price”; (2) there was a significant difference between genders on the key factors of perceived value (“recognition”, “brand advantage”, and “perceived price”). Specifically, females have higher perceived values of “recognition”, “brand advantage”, and “perceived price” than males; (3) there was a significant effect of income level on the key factor (“perceived price”) of perceived value. Specifically, respondents with an income level of NTD15,001–30,000 had a higher perceived value of “perceived price” than respondents earning NTD30,001–45,000. Among the five key factors, “recognition” and “brand advantage” are primary factors influencing purchase motivation; “recognition”, “brand advantage”, and “service quality” are primary factors that could influence brand loyalty; “perceived price” is the primary factor that affects purchase intention. This study contributes to the green market segmentation of smartphones. The limitations of the study relate to the size and distribution of the samples.

Suggested Citation

  • Jui-Che Tu & Xiu-Yue Zhang & Sin-Yi Huang, 2018. "Key Factors of Sustainability for Smartphones Based on Taiwanese Consumers’ Perceived Values," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(12), pages 1-22, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:12:p:4446-:d:185935
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Teen-Hang Meen & Charles Tijus & Jui-Che Tu, 2019. "Selected Papers from the Eurasian Conference on Educational Innovation 2019," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(23), pages 1-1, December.
    2. David Baeza Moyano & Yolanda Sola & Roberto Alonso González-Lezcano, 2020. "Blue-Light Levels Emitted from Portable Electronic Devices Compared to Sunlight," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(16), pages 1-9, August.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumers’ perceived value; smartphone sustainability; key factors; green market segmentation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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