IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jijerp/v19y2022i20p13168-d940827.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

“ ANZANSI Program Taught Me Many Things in Life ”: Families’ Experiences with a Combination Intervention to Prevent Adolescent Girls’ Unaccompanied Migration for Labor

Author

Listed:
  • Ozge Sensoy Bahar

    (Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA)

  • Alice Boateng

    (Department of Social Work, University of Ghana, Accra P.O. Box LG419, Ghana)

  • Portia B. Nartey

    (Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA)

  • Abdallah Ibrahim

    (School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra P.O. Box LG419, Ghana)

  • Kingsley Kumbelim

    (BasicNeeds Ghana, Tamale P.O. Box TL1140, Ghana)

  • Proscovia Nabunya

    (Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA)

  • Fred M. Ssewamala

    (Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA)

  • Mary M. McKay

    (Vice Provost Office, Washington University in St. Louis, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA)

Abstract

Approximately 160 million children work as child laborers globally, 39% of whom are female. Ghana is one of the countries with the highest rates of child labor. Child labor has serious health, mental health, and educational consequences, and those who migrate independently for child labor are even at higher risk. Yet, evidence-based efforts to prevent unaccompanied child migration are limited. In this study, we examined the acceptability of a family-level intervention, called ANZANSI (resilience in local language) combining two evidence-based interventions, a family economic empowerment intervention and a multiple family group family strengthening intervention, to reduce the risk factors associated with the independent migration of adolescent girls from the Northern region to big cities in Ghana. We conducted semi-structured interviews separately with 20 adolescent girls and their caregivers who participated in ANZANSI. Interviews were conducted in the local language and transcribed and translated verbatim. Informed by the theoretical framework of acceptability, the data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The results showed high intervention acceptability among both adolescent girls and their caregivers, including low burden, positive affective attitude, high perceived effectiveness, low opportunity costs, and high self-efficacy. The study findings underline the high need for such interventions in low-resource contexts in Ghana and provide the foundation for testing this intervention in a larger randomized trial.

Suggested Citation

  • Ozge Sensoy Bahar & Alice Boateng & Portia B. Nartey & Abdallah Ibrahim & Kingsley Kumbelim & Proscovia Nabunya & Fred M. Ssewamala & Mary M. McKay, 2022. "“ ANZANSI Program Taught Me Many Things in Life ”: Families’ Experiences with a Combination Intervention to Prevent Adolescent Girls’ Unaccompanied Migration for Labor," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(20), pages 1-19, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jijerp:v:19:y:2022:i:20:p:13168-:d:940827
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/19/20/13168/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/19/20/13168/
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Heady, Christopher, 2003. "The Effect of Child Labor on Learning Achievement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 385-398, February.
    2. André Portela Souza, 2007. "Child Labor, School Attendance, and Intrahousehold Gender Bias in Brazil," The World Bank Economic Review, World Bank, vol. 21(2), pages 301-316, March.
    3. Blunch,Niels-Hugo & Verner,Dorte, 2000. "Revisiting the link between poverty and child labor - the Ghanaian experience," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2488, The World Bank.
    4. Rasheda Khanam, 2008. "Child labour and school attendance: evidence from Bangladesh," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, vol. 35(1/2), pages 77-98, January.
    5. Theresa Yaaba Baah-Ennumh & Martina Owusu Adoma, 2012. "The Living Conditions of Female Head Porters in the Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana," Journal of Social and Development Sciences, AMH International, vol. 3(7), pages 229-244.
    6. Khanam, Rasheda & Ross, Russell, 2005. "Impact of Child Labour on School Attendance and School Attainment: Evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 9397, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Apr 2008.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hiromi Tobe & Mariko Sakka & Sachiko Kita & Mari Ikeda & Kiyoko Kamibeppu, 2022. "The Efficacy of a Resilience-Enhancement Program for Mothers Based on Emotion Regulation: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Japan," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(22), pages 1-20, November.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Alice Grinberg, 2015. "The Effect of Birth Order on Occupational Choice," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(4), pages 463-476, December.
    2. Jinnat Ara & Dipanwita Sarkar & Jayanta Sarkar, 2021. "Like mother like daughter? Occupational mobility among children under asset transfer program in Bangladesh," QuBE Working Papers 061, QUT Business School.
    3. Ana Dammert, 2010. "Siblings, child labor, and schooling in Nicaragua and Guatemala," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 199-224, January.
    4. Chiwaula, Levison/S, 2009. "Child labour and poverty linkages: A micro analysis from rural Malawian data," MPRA Paper 25915, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Oct 2009.
    5. Edmonds, Eric V., 2008. "Child Labor," Handbook of Development Economics, in: T. Paul Schultz & John A. Strauss (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 57, pages 3607-3709, Elsevier.
    6. Tang, Can & Zhao, Zhong, 2023. "Informal institution meets child development: Clan culture and child labor in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 277-294.
    7. Congdon Fors, Heather & Houngbedji, Kenneth & Lindskog, Annika, 2019. "Land certification and schooling in rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 190-208.
    8. Rasheda Khanam, 2008. "Child labour and school attendance: evidence from Bangladesh," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, vol. 35(1/2), pages 77-98, January.
    9. Nkamleu, Guy Blaise, 2006. "Poverty and Child Farm Labor in Africa: Wealth Paradox or bad Orthodoxy," MPRA Paper 15105, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Khanam, Rasheda & Ross, Russell, 2005. "Impact of Child Labour on School Attendance and School Attainment: Evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 9397, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Apr 2008.
    11. Krauss,Alexander, 2013. "Understanding child labor beyond poverty : the structure of the economy, social norms, and no returns to rural basic education," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6513, The World Bank.
    12. Jigme Nidup, 2016. "Determinants of School Enrolment in Bhutan: Does Income Matter to Poor?," Asian Journal of Economic Modelling, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(2), pages 95-103, June.
    13. Bhuiya, Mohammad Monzur Morshed & Khanam, Rasheda & Rahman, Mohammad Mafizur & Nghiem, Son, 2019. "Microcredit participation and child schooling in rural Bangladesh: Evidence from a cross-sectional survey," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 293-301.
    14. Aubrey Keeler Saunders & Samuel Brazys, 2022. "Does Distance Matter? Proximity to Exporting Firms on Child Labour and Education Rates: Evidence from Bangladesh," Working Papers 202206, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    15. Deniz Güvercin, 2020. "Women in Politics and Child Labor: an Instrumental Variable Approach," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 32(4), pages 873-888, September.
    16. Maertens, Miet & Verhofstadt, Ellen, 2013. "Horticultural exports, female wage employment and primary school enrolment: Theory and evidence from Senegal," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 118-131.
    17. Seth R. Gitter & Bradford L. Barham, 2008. "Women's Power, Conditional Cash Transfers, and Schooling in Nicaragua," The World Bank Economic Review, World Bank, vol. 22(2), pages 271-290, May.
    18. Mohammad Nashir Uddin & Mohammad Hamiduzzaman & Bernhard G. Gunter, 2009. "Physical and Psychological Implications of Risky Child Labor: A Study in Sylhet City, Bangladesh," Bangladesh Development Research Working Paper Series (BDRWPS) BDRWPS No. 8, Bangladesh Development Research Center (BDRC).
    19. Zhao, Liqui & Wang, Fei & Zhao, Zhong, 2016. "Trade liberalisation and child labour in China," MERIT Working Papers 2016-054, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    20. Keita, Moussa, 2014. "Contribution des inobservables aux disparités de genre dans la scolarisation et le travail des enfants au Mali [Contribution of unobservables to gender disparities in schooling and child labor in M," MPRA Paper 57532, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jijerp:v:19:y:2022:i:20:p:13168-:d:940827. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: MDPI Indexing Manager (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.mdpi.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.