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Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Their Driving Forces of Land Use Change Based on Economic Contributive Coefficient (ECC) and Ecological Support Coefficient (ESC) in the Lower Yellow River Region (1995–2018)

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  • Tianqi Rong

    () (Key Laboratory of Geospatial Technology for Middle and Lower Yellow River Region, Research Center of Regional Development and Planning, Institute of Agriculture and Rural sustainable Development, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004, China)

  • Pengyan Zhang

    () (Key Laboratory of Geospatial Technology for Middle and Lower Yellow River Region, Research Center of Regional Development and Planning, Institute of Agriculture and Rural sustainable Development, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004, China
    Collaborative Innovation Center on Yellow River Civilization of Henan Province, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001, China)

  • Wenlong Jing

    () (Guangzhou Institute of Geography, Guangzhou 510070, China
    Key Laboratory of Guangdong for Utilization of Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System, Guangzhou 510070, China
    Guangdong Open Laboratory of Geospatial Information Technology and Application, Guangzhou 510070, China)

  • Yu Zhang

    () (Key Laboratory of Geospatial Technology for Middle and Lower Yellow River Region, Research Center of Regional Development and Planning, Institute of Agriculture and Rural sustainable Development, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004, China)

  • Yanyan Li

    () (Key Laboratory of Geospatial Technology for Middle and Lower Yellow River Region, Research Center of Regional Development and Planning, Institute of Agriculture and Rural sustainable Development, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004, China)

  • Dan Yang

    () (Key Laboratory of Geospatial Technology for Middle and Lower Yellow River Region, Research Center of Regional Development and Planning, Institute of Agriculture and Rural sustainable Development, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004, China)

  • Jiaxin Yang

    () (Key Laboratory of Geospatial Technology for Middle and Lower Yellow River Region, Research Center of Regional Development and Planning, Institute of Agriculture and Rural sustainable Development, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004, China)

  • Hao Chang

    () (Key Laboratory of Geospatial Technology for Middle and Lower Yellow River Region, Research Center of Regional Development and Planning, Institute of Agriculture and Rural sustainable Development, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004, China)

  • Linna Ge

    () (Key Laboratory of Geospatial Technology for Middle and Lower Yellow River Region, Research Center of Regional Development and Planning, Institute of Agriculture and Rural sustainable Development, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004, China)

Abstract

Land use change is the second largest source of greenhouse gas emissions after fossil combustion, which can hurt ecological environment severely. Intensive study on land use carbon emissions is of great significance to alleviate environmental pressure, formulate carbon emission reduction policy, and protect ecological development. The lower Yellow River area is an important area of economic development, grain cultivation, and agricultural production in China. Land use change has significant economic, environmental, and ecological impacts in this region. Deep study of land used carbon emissions and its influencing factors in the lower Yellow River area is not only of great significance to the environmental improvement in the Yellow River basin, but also can provide references for the research of other basins. Based on this, this paper studies the land use carbon emissions of 20 cities in the lower Yellow River area from 1995 to 2018. The results showed that from 1995 to 2018, the land use change was characterized by the decrease of the ecological land and the increase of the built-up land significantly. The overall carbon emission of the lower Yellow River area is increasing, and the built-up land is the main factor that leads to the increase of carbon emission, which can be also proven by the analysis of the Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence, and Technology (STIRPAT) model. The economic contributive coefficient (ECC) and ecological support coefficient (ESC) of carbon emission in the lower Yellow River area show a trend of high in Zhengzhou, Jinan, and Zibo and low in Zhoukou, Shangqiu, and Heze, and there was no significant changes during the study period, which indicates that each city did not achieve the coordinated development of the ecological economy. Finally, analysis results of the STIRPAT model indicated that the area of built-up land had the greatest impact on land use carbon emissions, followed by tertiary industry, whereas per capita gross domestic product (GDP) had the smallest impact. For every 1% increase in the area of built-up land, carbon emissions increased by 1.024%. By contrast, for every 1% increase in the contribution of tertiary industry to the GDP and per capita GDP, carbon emissions decreased by 0.051% and 0.034%, respectively. According to the study, there are still many problems in the coordinated development of economy and ecology in the lower Yellow River area. The lower Yellow River area should control the expansion of built-up land, afforestation, development of technology, reduction of carbon emissions, and promotion of the high-quality development of the Yellow River Basin.

Suggested Citation

  • Tianqi Rong & Pengyan Zhang & Wenlong Jing & Yu Zhang & Yanyan Li & Dan Yang & Jiaxin Yang & Hao Chang & Linna Ge, 2020. "Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Their Driving Forces of Land Use Change Based on Economic Contributive Coefficient (ECC) and Ecological Support Coefficient (ESC) in the Lower Yellow River Region (1995–20," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(10), pages 1-18, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jeners:v:13:y:2020:i:10:p:2600-:d:360705
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    carbon emission; land use; economic contributive coefficient (ECC); ecological support coefficient (ESC); STIRPAT model; lower Yellow River area;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • Q49 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Other

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