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Trends in metropolitan employment growth

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  • Gerald A. Carlino

Abstract

In the early part of this century, both employment and population tended to concentrate in large metropolitan areas such as New York. Over the past 40 years, however, jobs and people have spread out as both firms and workers have sought the lower costs of smaller, less congested places. In fact, Jerry Carlino argues that "congestion costs"--traffic, pollution, and a higher cost of living--are a major factor in the relatively slower growth of large metropolitan areas in the second half of the century.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerald A. Carlino, 1998. "Trends in metropolitan employment growth," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Jul, pages 13-22.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpbr:y:1998:i:jul:p:13-22
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    File URL: http://www.phil.frb.org/files/br/brja98jc.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eaton, Jonathan & Eckstein, Zvi, 1997. "Cities and growth: Theory and evidence from France and Japan," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4-5), pages 443-474, August.
    2. Gerald A. Carlino, 1995. "Do education and training lead to faster growth in cities?," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Jan, pages 15-22.
    3. Henderson, J. Vernon, 1987. "General equilibrium modeling of systems of cities," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: E. S. Mills (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 23, pages 927-956 Elsevier.
    4. Glaeser, Edward L & Hedi D. Kallal & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(6), pages 1126-1152, December.
      • Edward L. Glaeser & Hedi D. Kallal & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1991. "Growth in Cities," NBER Working Papers 3787, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Kallal, Hedi D. & Scheinkman, Jose A. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Scholarly Articles 3451309, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    5. Leo Sveikauskas, 1975. "The Productivity of Cities," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 89(3), pages 393-413.
    6. Duncan Black & Vernon Henderson, 1997. "Urban Growth," NBER Working Papers 6008, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Satyajit Chatterjee & Gerald A. Carlino, 1998. "Aggregate employment growth and the deconcentration of metropolitan employment," Working Papers 98-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    8. Carlino, Gerald A., 1985. "Declining city productivity and the growth of rural regions: A test of alternative explanations," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 11-27, July.
    9. Segal, David, 1976. "Are There Returns to Scale in City Size?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 58(3), pages 339-350, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yankow, Jeffrey J., 2006. "Why do cities pay more? An empirical examination of some competing theories of the urban wage premium," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 139-161, September.
    2. Arauzo Carod, Josep Maria, 2015. "Agglomeration vs. dispersion of economic activities in the districts of Paris," Working Papers 2072/246965, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    3. Viggo Jean-Hansen, 2011. "Is economic growth in cities crowding out freight handling and transport?," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1615, European Regional Science Association.
    4. M. Bellinzas, 2004. "Dinamiche demografiche, agglomerazione e determinanti economiche. Il caso italiano," Working Paper CRENoS 200407, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    5. Arauzo-Carod, Josep-Maria, 2000. "Industrial Location Patterns In Catalonia: Industrial Mix And Human Capital," ERSA conference papers ersa00p136, European Regional Science Association.

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