IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Interbank payments relationships in the antebellum United States: evidence from Pennsylvania


  • Warren E. Weber


This article investigates U.S. interbank relationships before the Civil War using previously unknown data for Pennsylvania banks from 1851 to 1859 that disaggregate the amounts due from other banks by debtor bank. It finds that country banks, banks outside of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, dealt almost exclusively with financial center banks. Most had a large, highly stable relationship with a single correspondent bank. The location of a country bank's correspondent was consistent with trade patterns, particularly railroad and canal linkages. Philadelphia banks, in contrast, did not establish correspondent-type banking relationships. Further, Philadelphia's correspondent banking market was not highly concentrated, and entry was easy.

Suggested Citation

  • Warren E. Weber, 2003. "Interbank payments relationships in the antebellum United States: evidence from Pennsylvania," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Sum, pages 2-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmqr:y:2003:i:sum:p:2-16:n:v.27no.3

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ricardo de O. Cavalcanti & Andres Erosa & Ted Temzelides, 1999. "Private Money and Reserve Management in a Random-Matching Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(5), pages 929-945, October.
    2. Champ, Bruce & Wallace, Neil & Weber, Warren E., 1994. "Interest rates under the U.S. national banking system," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 343-358, December.
    3. Bullard, James & Smith, Bruce D., 2003. "Intermediaries and payments instruments," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 109(2), pages 172-197, April.
    4. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    5. Bruce Champ & Bruce D. Smith & Stephen D. Williamson, 1996. "Currency Elasticity and Banking Panics: Theory and Evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(4), pages 828-864, November.
    6. Antoine Martin & Cyril Monnet & Warren E. Weber, 2000. "Costly banknote issuance and interest rates under the national banking system," Working Papers 601, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    7. Ricardo de O. Cavalcanti & Neil Wallace, 1999. "A model of private bank-note issue," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 2(1), pages 104-136, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Weber, Warren E., 2006. "Early State Banks in the United States: How Many Were There and When Did They Exist?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(02), pages 433-455, June.
    2. Anderson, Haelim Park & Bluedorn, John C., 2017. "Stopping contagion with bailouts: Micro-evidence from Pennsylvania bank networks during the panic of 1884," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 139-149.
    3. repec:eee:jfinec:v:125:y:2017:i:3:p:434-453 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Chang, Howard H. & Danilevsky, Marina & Evans, David S. & Garcia-Swartz, Daniel D., 2008. "The economics of market coordination for the pre-Fed check-clearing system: A peek into the Bloomington (IL) node," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 445-461, September.
    5. Calomiris, Charles W. & Carlson, Mark, 2017. "Interbank networks in the National Banking Era: Their purpose and their role in the Panic of 1893," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(3), pages 434-453.
    6. repec:eee:jbfina:v:83:y:2017:i:c:p:221-231 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    Banks and banking;


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedmqr:y:2003:i:sum:p:2-16:n:v.27no.3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jannelle Ruswick). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.