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The effects of health and wealth shocks on retirement decisions

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  • Conley, Dalton
  • Thompson, Jason

Abstract

Both health status and net worth can affect retirement decisions. In some cases, early retirement may be precipitated by a shock to an individual’s health and/or economic status. The authors examine how health and wealth shocks affect retirement decisions. They use data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to estimate a first-differences model of health and wealth shocks on retirement over the course of the 2000s in the United States. Their results suggest that acute health shocks are associated with labor market exits for older American men but not women. These results appear particularly strong for blacks, whose labor force participation seems particularly sensitive to health status, which may be due to different occupations for blacks and whites.

Suggested Citation

  • Conley, Dalton & Thompson, Jason, 2013. "The effects of health and wealth shocks on retirement decisions," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 389-404.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrv:y:2013:i:september:p:389-404:n:v.95no.5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. MacKinnon, James G & Magee, Lonnie, 1990. "Transforming the Dependent Variable in Regression Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 31(2), pages 315-339, May.
    2. Cai, Lixin, 2010. "The relationship between health and labour force participation: Evidence from a panel data simultaneous equation model," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 77-90, January.
    3. Eugenio Zucchelli & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice & Anthony Harris, 2010. "The Effects of Health Shocks on labour Market Exits: Evidence from the HILDA Survey," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 13(2), pages 191-218.
    4. Disney, Richard & Emmerson, Carl & Wakefield, Matthew, 2006. "Ill health and retirement in Britain: A panel data-based analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 621-649, July.
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    Keywords

    Retirement; Wealth; Health;

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