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Do donors care about declining trade revenue from liberalization? an analysis of bilateral aid allocation

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  • Javed Younas
  • Subhayu Bandyopadhyay

Abstract

Many developing-country governments rely heavily on trade tax revenue. Therefore, trade liberalization can be a potential source of significant fiscal instability and may affect government spending on development activities-at least in the short run. This article investigates whether donors use aid to compensate recipient nations for lost trade revenue or perhaps to reward them for moving toward freer trade regimes. The authors do not find empirical evidence supporting such motives. This is of some concern because binding government revenue constraints may hinder development prospects of some poorer nations. The authors use fixed effects to control for the usual political, strategic, and other considerations for aid allocations.

Suggested Citation

  • Javed Younas & Subhayu Bandyopadhyay, 2009. "Do donors care about declining trade revenue from liberalization? an analysis of bilateral aid allocation," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 141-154.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrv:y:2009:i:may:p:141-154:n:v.91no.3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Howard J. Wall, 2007. "The determinants of aid in the post-cold war era," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov, pages 533-548.
    2. Alesina, Alberto & Dollar, David, 2000. "Who Gives Foreign Aid to Whom and Why?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 33-63, March.
    3. Bagwell, Kyle & Staiger, Robert W., 2001. "Reciprocity, non-discrimination and preferential agreements in the multilateral trading system," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 281-325, June.
    4. Dollar, David & Levin, Victoria, 2004. "Increasing selectivity of foreign aid, 1984-2002," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3299, The World Bank.
    5. Lahiri, Sajal & Raimondos-Moller, Pascalis, 1997. "Competition for aid and trade policy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3-4), pages 369-385, November.
    6. David Dollar & Craig Burnside, 2000. "Aid, Policies, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 847-868, September.
    7. Axel Dreher, 2006. "Does globalization affect growth? Evidence from a new index of globalization," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(10), pages 1091-1110.
    8. Baunsgaard, Thomas & Keen, Michael, 2010. "Tax revenue and (or?) trade liberalization," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 563-577, October.
    9. Anne Boschini & Anders Olofsgård, 2007. "Foreign aid: An instrument for fighting communism?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(4), pages 622-648.
    10. Ilyana Kuziemko & Eric Werker, 2006. "How Much Is a Seat on the Security Council Worth? Foreign Aid and Bribery at the United Nations," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(5), pages 905-930, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sijeong Lim & Victor Menaldo & Aseem Prakash, 2015. "Foreign aid, economic globalization, and pollution," Policy Sciences, Springer;Society of Policy Sciences, vol. 48(2), pages 181-205, June.
    2. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Lahiri, Sajal & Younas, Javed, 2011. "Should Easier Access to International Credit Replace Foreign Aid?," IZA Discussion Papers 6024, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Lim, Sijeong & Mosley, Layna & Prakash, Aseem, 2015. "Revenue Substitution? How Foreign Aid Inflows Moderate the Effect of Bilateral Trade Pressures on Labor Rights," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 295-309.
    4. Gnangnon, Sèna Kimm, 2016. "Aid for Trade and trade tax revenues in developing countries," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 9-22.
    5. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Lahiri, Sajal & Younas, Javed, 2012. "Do countries with greater credit constraints receive more foreign aid?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov, pages 481-493.
    6. repec:wsi:jicepx:v:08:y:2017:i:03:n:s1793993317500144 is not listed on IDEAS

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