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COVID-19: Scarring Body and Mind

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  • Julian Kozlowski

Abstract

"Belief scarring" from the COVID-19 pandemic may generate prolonged effects on the economy—with economic costs greater than the drop in GDP in 2020.

Suggested Citation

  • Julian Kozlowski, 2020. "COVID-19: Scarring Body and Mind," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue 43, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedles:89388
    DOI: 10.20955/es.2020.43
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Julian Kozlowski, 2019. "Tail Risk: Part 1, The Persistent Effects of the Great Recession," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue 18, August.
    2. Venky Venkateswaran & Laura Veldkamp & Julian Kozlowski, 2015. "The Tail that Wags the Economy: Belief-Driven Business Cycles and Persistent Stagnation," 2015 Meeting Papers 800, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Julian Kozlowski & Laura Veldkamp & Venky Venkateswaran, 2020. "Scarring Body and Mind: The Long-Term Belief-Scarring Effects of COVID-19," NBER Working Papers 27439, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Julian Kozlowski, 2019. "Tail Risk: Part 2, The Missing Recovery After the Great Recession," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue 19, August.
    5. Julian Kozlowski, 2019. "Tail Risk: Part 3, The Return on Safe and Liquid Assets," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue 20, August.
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