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Agglomeration in the U.S. auto supplier industry

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  • Thomas H. Klier

Abstract

Analysis of a large set of plant-level data shows the auto supplier industry to be highly spatially concentrated. Data on location of the plants' customers, however, suggest that immediate proximity to assembly plant is not necessary, despite a production system that emphasized low inventories and tight linkages.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas H. Klier, 1999. "Agglomeration in the U.S. auto supplier industry," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q I, pages 18-34.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:1999:i:qi:p:18-34:n:v.23no.1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2003. "Hot Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(6), pages 1262-1292, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Klier, Thomas H., 2000. "Does "Just-in-time" Mean "Right-next-door"? Evidence from the Auto Industry on the Spatial Concentration of Supplier Networks," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 30(1).
    2. Liu, Xiaoyun & Xin, Xian, 2011. "Transportation uncertainty and international trade," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 156-162, January.
    3. Barrios, Salvador & Mas, Matilde & Navajas, Elena & Quesada, Javier, 2008. "Mapping the ICT in EU Regions: Location, Employment, Factors of Attractiveness and Economic Impact," MPRA Paper 6998, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Franz-Josef Bade & Eckhardt Bode & Eleonora Cutrini, 2015. "Spatial fragmentation of industries by functions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(1), pages 215-250, January.
    5. Richard E. Kaglic & William A. Testa, 1999. "Slow work force growth: a challenge for the Midwest?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q II, pages 31-46.
    6. Anthony Venables, 2001. "Geography and International Inequalities: The Impact of New Technologies," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 135-159, June.
    7. Harrigan, James & Venables, Anthony J., 2006. "Timeliness and agglomeration," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 300-316, March.
    8. Adelheid Holl & Rafael Pardo & Ruth Rama, 2013. "Spatial patterns of adoption of just-in-time manufacturing," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 92(1), pages 51-67, March.
    9. Harrigan, James & Venables, Tony, 2004. "Timeliness, trade and agglomeration," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2300, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Adelheid Holl & Rafael Pardo & Ruth Rama, 2010. "Just-in-Time Manufacturing Systems, Subcontracting and Geographic Proximity," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(5), pages 519-533.
    11. Johannes Van Biesebroeck, 2010. "Bidding for Investment Projects: Smart Public Policy or Corporate Welfare?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 36(s1), pages 31-48, April.
    12. Thomas H. Klier, 1998. "Geographic concentration in U.S. manufacturing: evidence from the U.S. auto supplier industry," Working Paper Series WP-98-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    13. Stephen Redding & Anthony J. Venables, 2002. "The Economics of Isolation and Distance," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 28, pages 93-108.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Automobile industry and trade;

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