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Maternal Country of Birth Differences in Breastfeeding at Hospital Discharge in Ireland

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Listed:
  • Aoife Brick

    (Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin; Trinity College Dublin)

  • Anne Nolan

    (Trinity College Dublin; Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

Abstract

In 2010, 46 per cent of Irish-born mothers were breastfeeding at hospital discharge, in comparison with 84 per cent of non-Irish-born mothers. Using data from the Irish National Perinatal Reporting System, we find that maternal country of birth is a large and highly significant predictor of breastfeeding at hospital discharge in Ireland over the period 2004-2010. Furthermore, we find that most of the difference in breastfeeding rates between Irish-born and non-Irish-born mothers is unexplained, i.e., not due to differences in observable characteristics. Our findings suggest that there are strong cultural/attitudinal differences in breastfeeding behaviour between Irish-born and non-Irish-born mothers.

Suggested Citation

  • Aoife Brick & Anne Nolan, 2014. "Maternal Country of Birth Differences in Breastfeeding at Hospital Discharge in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(4), pages 455-484.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:45:y:2014:i:4:p:455-484
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    References listed on IDEAS

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