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Income and Wealth in The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

Author

Listed:
  • Vincent O'Sullivan

    (Lancaster University)

  • Brian Nolan

    (Oxford University)

  • Alan Barrett

    (Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin; Trinity College Dublin, Ireland)

  • Cara Dooley

    (trinity College Dublin)

Abstract

Between 2009 and 2011, data were collected under the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). Over 8,500 people aged 50 and over and living in Ireland were interviewed about a wide range of topics covering socio-economic and health issues. Our primary goals in this paper are to present details on two of the variables which will be of particular interest to economists, namely income and wealth, and to discuss issues in relation to their use. We describe how the income and wealth data were collected. We assess the quality of the income data by comparing them to those obtained through the European Union Survey on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC). We examine the joint distribution of income and assets and conduct a small exercise on using the data to design a means-testing system.

Suggested Citation

  • Vincent O'Sullivan & Brian Nolan & Alan Barrett & Cara Dooley, 2014. "Income and Wealth in The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(3), pages 329-348.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:45:y:2014:i:3:p:329-348
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Oswald, Andrew J. & Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2008. "Does happiness adapt? A longitudinal study of disability with implications for economists and judges," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1061-1077, June.
    2. James P. Smith, 2007. "The Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Health over the Life-Course," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(4).
    3. Cameron,A. Colin & Trivedi,Pravin K., 2005. "Microeconometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521848053, April.
    4. David, Paul A. & Reder, Melvin W. (ed.), 1974. "Nations and Households in Economic Growth," Elsevier Monographs, Elsevier, edition 1, number 9780122050503, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Irene Mosca & Alan Barrett, 2016. "The impact of adult child emigration on the mental health of older parents," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 687-719, July.
    2. Doorley, Karina & Nolan, Anne, 2019. "The Determinants of Retirement Planning within Couples in Ireland," IZA Discussion Papers 12188, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Nolan, Anne & Doorley, Karina, 2019. "Financial Literacy and Preparation for Retirement," IZA Discussion Papers 12187, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. A. Barrett & V. O'Sullivan, 2014. "The wealth, health and well-being of Ireland's older people before and during the economic crisis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(10), pages 675-678, July.
    5. Mosca, Irene & McCrory, Cathal, 2016. "Personality and wealth accumulation among older couples: Do dispositional characteristics pay dividends?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 1-19.
    6. Beirne, Keelan & Nolan, Anne & Roantree, Barra, 2020. "Income adequacy in retirement: Evidence from the Irish longitudinal study on ageing (TILDA)," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS107.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    family; children; Ireland;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination

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