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The Socio-Economic Gradient Of Obesity In Ireland

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  • David Madden

    (University College, Dublin)

Abstract

Using the nationally representative SLÁN datasets for 2002 and 2007 we calculate concentration indices for the incidence of obesity for men and women. We find higher concentration indices for women than for men in both years, but that the gap narrowed over time with the index rising for men but falling for women. A decomposition of the concentration index suggests that the greatest contributions to the index for both men and women come from own selfassessed health, third level education and equivalised income.

Suggested Citation

  • David Madden, 2013. "The Socio-Economic Gradient Of Obesity In Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 44(2), pages 181-196.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:44:y:2013:i:2:p:181-196
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David Madden, 2015. "The Poverty Effects Of A ‘Fat‐Tax’ In Ireland," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 104-121, January.
    2. Karina Acosta, 2012. "La obesidad y su concentración según nivel socioeconómico en Colombia," Revista de Economía del Rosario, Universidad del Rosario, July.
    3. Mohammad Hajizadeh & M. Karen Campbell & Sisira Sarma, 2014. "Socioeconomic inequalities in adult obesity risk in Canada: trends and decomposition analyses," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(2), pages 203-221, March.
    4. McGovern, Mark E., 2014. "Comparing the relationship between stature and later life health in six low and middle income countries," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 4(C), pages 128-148.
    5. Rita Smith & Kate Frazer & Abbey Hyde & Laserina O'Connor & Patricia Davidson, 2018. "“Heart disease never entered my head”: Women's understanding of coronary heart disease risk factors," Journal of Clinical Nursing, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 27(21-22), pages 3953-3967, November.
    6. David Madden, 2014. "The Socio-economic Gradient of Obesity in Ireland – Corrigendum," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(3), pages 451-454.
    7. Madden, D., 2016. "Child and Adolescent Obesity in Ireland: A Longitudinal Perspective," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/12, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    8. Davillas, Apostolos & Benzeval, Michaela, 2016. "Alternative measures to BMI: Exploring income-related inequalities in adiposity in Great Britain," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 223-232.
    9. Walsh, Brendan & Cullinan, John, 2015. "Decomposing socioeconomic inequalities in childhood obesity: Evidence from Ireland," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 60-72.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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