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The determinants of life satisfaction

Author

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  • Dorota Celińska
  • Kornel Olszewski

Abstract

In this article, we present a multidimensional analysis of satisfaction with life. The relationships among satisfaction within four domains of respondents’ lives (satisfaction with family, acquaintances, health and achievements) and a set of socio-economic factors along with variables from the Beck’s Depression Inventory are examined. The results of canonical analysis show strong correlation between satisfaction with health, the symptoms of depression and feeling of trust. Satisfaction with family relationships and life achievement is correlated with feelings of love, age, symptoms of depression and number of social contacts. There is provided an insight into impact of education, income, marital status, gender and social activity on life satisfaction. The results are compared with previous research.

Suggested Citation

  • Dorota Celińska & Kornel Olszewski, 2013. "The determinants of life satisfaction," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 34.
  • Handle: RePEc:eko:ekoeko:34_5
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    File URL: http://ekonomia.wne.uw.edu.pl/ekonomia/getFile/369
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    References listed on IDEAS

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