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Personal Capital and Emotional Intelligence: An Increasingly Important Intangible Source of Economic Growth

  • John F. Tomer

    ()

    (Department of Economics and Finance, Manhattan College)

This paper focuses on a new source of economic growth, personal capital formation, and provides an explanation for a part of economic growth that has heretofore been unexplained. Personal capital is the human capacity reflecting the quality of an individual's psychological, physical, and spiritual functioning; it is a capacity fundamentally different from cognitive ability. Spending effort to improve emotional intelligence, often in order to improve job performance, is the essence of what successful investment in personal capital involves. Given the increasing investment in it and the evidence of its importance, economists can no longer afford to neglect the contribution of personal capital to economic growth.

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File URL: http://college.holycross.edu/RePEc/eej/Archive/Volume29/V29N3P453_470.pdf
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Article provided by Eastern Economic Association in its journal Eastern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 29 (2003)
Issue (Month): 3 (Summer)
Pages: 453-470

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Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:29:y:2003:i:3:p:453-470
Contact details of provider: Postal: c/o Dr. Alexandre Olbrecht, The Anisfield School of Business 205, Ramapo College, 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Ramapo, New Jersey 07430, USA
Phone: (201) 684-7346
Web page: http://www.ramapo.edu/eea/journal.html
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  1. John F. Helliwell & Robert D. Putnam, 1995. "Economic Growth and Social Capital in Italy," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 21(3), pages 295-307, Summer.
  2. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?," NBER Working Papers 6564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Knack, Stephen & Keefer, Philip, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-88, November.
  4. Melissa Osborne & Herbert Gintis & Samuel Bowles, 2001. "The Determinants of Earnings: A Behavioral Approach," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1137-1176, December.
  5. Mankiw, N Gregory & Romer, David & Weil, David N, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-37, May.
  6. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 1994. "Sources of economic growth," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-46, June.
  7. B. F. Kiker, 1966. "The Historical Roots of the Concept of Human Capital," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 481.
  8. La Porta, Rafael, et al, 1997. "Trust in Large Organizations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 333-38, May.
  9. Goldsmith, Arthur H & Veum, Jonathan R & Darity, William, Jr, 1997. "The Impact of Psychological and Human Capital on Wages," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(4), pages 815-29, October.
  10. Greg J. Duncan & Rachel Dunifon & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, 2001. "As Ye Sweep, So Shall Ye Reap," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 150-154, May.
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