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Development Consequences of Armed Conflict

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Listed:
  • Gates, Scott
  • Hegre, Håvard
  • Nygård, Håvard Mokleiv
  • Strand, Håvard

Abstract

This paper conducts the first analysis of the effect of armed conflict on progress in meeting the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals. We also examine the effect of conflict on economic growth. Conflict has clear detrimental effects on the reduction of poverty and hunger, on primary education, on the reduction of child mortality, and on access to potable water. A medium-sized conflict with 2500 battle deaths is estimated to increase undernourishment an additional 3.3%, reduce life expectancy by about 1 year, increases infant mortality by 10%, and deprives an additional 1.8% of the population from access to potable water.

Suggested Citation

  • Gates, Scott & Hegre, Håvard & Nygård, Håvard Mokleiv & Strand, Håvard, 2012. "Development Consequences of Armed Conflict," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1713-1722.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:40:y:2012:i:9:p:1713-1722
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2012.04.031
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    References listed on IDEAS

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