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The Impact of Modern Economic Growth on Urban–Rural Differences in Subjective Well-Being

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  • Easterlin, Richard A.
  • Angelescu, Laura
  • Zweig, Jacqueline S.

Abstract

At low levels of economic development there are substantial gaps favoring urban over rural areas in income, education, and occupational structure, and consequently a large excess of urban over rural life satisfaction, despite important urban problems of pollution, congestion, and the like. At more advanced development levels, these economic differentials tend to disappear, and rural areas approach or exceed urban in life satisfaction. Both across-country and within-country regression analyses of 2005–08 data from the Gallup World Poll support these conclusions.

Suggested Citation

  • Easterlin, Richard A. & Angelescu, Laura & Zweig, Jacqueline S., 2011. "The Impact of Modern Economic Growth on Urban–Rural Differences in Subjective Well-Being," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2187-2198.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:12:p:2187-2198
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2011.04.015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mikko Weckroth & Teemu Kemppainen & Jens F.L. Sørensen, 2015. "Predicting GDP of 289 NUTS Regions in Europe with ?Subjective? Indicators for Human and Social Capital," ERSA conference papers ersa15p22, European Regional Science Association.
    2. John V Winters & Yu Li, 2017. "Urbanisation, natural amenities and subjective well-being: Evidence from US counties," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 54(8), pages 1956-1973, June.
    3. Fernandez, Antonia & Della Giusta, Marina & Kambhampati, Uma S., 2015. "The Intrinsic Value of Agency: The Case of Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 92-107.
    4. John B. Horowitz & H. Brian Moehring, 2014. "How Economic Development Affects Antibiotic Resistance," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 14(1), pages 58-77, Fall.
    5. Luca D’Acci, 2014. "Monetary, Subjective and Quantitative Approaches to Assess Urban Quality of Life and Pleasantness in Cities (Hedonic Price, Willingness-to-Pay, Positional Value, Life Satisfaction, Isobenefit Lines)," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 115(2), pages 531-559, January.
    6. Hui Zhu & Fumin Deng & Xuedong Liang, 2017. "Overall Urban–Rural Coordination Measures—A Case Study in Sichuan Province, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-20, January.
    7. Felix Requena, 2016. "Rural–Urban Living and Level of Economic Development as Factors in Subjective Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(2), pages 693-708, September.
    8. Malgorzata Switek, 2011. "Life Satisfaction in Latin America: A Size-of-Place Analysis," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(7), pages 983-999, September.
    9. Ying Liang & Peigang Wang, 2014. "Influence of Prudential Value on the Subjective Well-Being of Chinese Urban–Rural Residents," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 118(3), pages 1249-1267, September.
    10. Nikolaev, Boris & Bennett, Daniel L., 2016. "Give me liberty and give me control: Economic freedom, control perceptions and the paradox of choice," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 45(S), pages 39-52.

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