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Health Insurance and Other Risk-Coping Strategies in Uganda: The Case of Microcare Insurance Ltd

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  • Dekker, Marleen
  • Wilms, Annegien

Abstract

Summary To reduce the burden of health expenditures in developing countries, health-insurance schemes have become popular and now feature prominently in poverty-reduction strategies. There is, however, limited empirical evidence on the effect of such schemes on the livelihoods of clients, especially regarding household strategies to finance medical expenditures. This paper explores the relationship between health insurance and other risk-coping strategies used to finance medical expenditures in Uganda. Insurance is associated with a lower frequency of asset sales but not with lower incidences of borrowing. The amount of money borrowed or generated through the sales of assets is lower for insured households.

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  • Dekker, Marleen & Wilms, Annegien, 2010. "Health Insurance and Other Risk-Coping Strategies in Uganda: The Case of Microcare Insurance Ltd," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 369-378, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:38:y:2010:i:3:p:369-378
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mebratie, Anagaw D. & Sparrow, Robert & Yilma, Zelalem & Alemu, Getnet & Bedi, Arjun S., 2015. "Enrollment in Ethiopia’s Community-Based Health Insurance Scheme," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 58-76.
    2. Zelalem Yilma & Anagaw Mebratie & Robert Sparrow & Degnet Abebaw & Marleen Dekker & Getnet Alemu & Arjun S. Bedi, 2014. "Coping with shocks in rural Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(7), pages 1009-1024, July.
    3. Hasna Khemili & Mounir Belloumi, 2018. "Social Security and Fighting Poverty in Tunisia," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-17, February.
    4. Zelalem Yilma & Anagaw Mebratie & Robert Sparrow & Marleen Dekker & Getnet Alemu & Arjun S. Bedi, 2015. "Impact of Ethiopia's Community Based Health Insurance on Household Economic Welfare," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(suppl_1), pages 164-173.
    5. Koen Rossel-Cambier, 2010. "Do Multiple Financial Services Enhance the Poverty Outreach of Microfinance Institutions?," Working Papers CEB 10-058, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    6. Landmann, Andreas & Frölich, Markus, 2015. "Can health-insurance help prevent child labor? An impact evaluation from Pakistan," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 51-59.
    7. Landmann, Andreas & Frölich, Markus, 2013. "Can Microinsurance Help Prevent Child Labor? An Impact Evaluation from Pakistan," IZA Discussion Papers 7337, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Koen Rossel-Cambier, 2011. "Is Combined Microfinance an Instrument to enhance Sustainable Pro-Poor Public Policy Outcomes?," Working Papers CEB 11-013, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    9. Austin, Kelly F. & DeScisciolo, Cristina & Samuelsen, Lene, 2016. "The Failures of Privatization: A Comparative Investigation of Tuberculosis Rates and the Structure of Healthcare in Less-Developed Nations, 1995–2010," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 450-460.
    10. Nikolaos Grigorakis & Christos Floros & Haritini Tsangari & Evangelos Tsoukatos, 2017. "Combined social and private health insurance versus catastrophic out of pocket payments for private hospital care in Greece," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 261-287, September.
    11. S. Savitha & K. Kiran, 2015. "Effectiveness of micro health insurance on financial protection: Evidence from India," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 53-71, March.

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