IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Common ground: Eight factors that influence walking and biking to school

  • Stewart, Orion
  • Vernez Moudon, Anne
  • Claybrooke, Charlotte
Registered author(s):

    The primary goals of Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs are to increase the number and safety of children walking, biking or using other forms of active travel to school (ATS). This study reviewed quantitative and qualitative research and identified eight common factors that influenced the choice of ATS: distance to school, parental fear of traffic and crime, family schedule constraints and values, neighborhood and family resources and culture, weather, and school characteristics. Suggestions were made as to how these barriers and facilitators of ATS could be integrated into the decision to fund local SRTS programs and to improve their effectiveness.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transport Policy.

    Volume (Year): 24 (2012)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 240-248

    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:24:y:2012:i:c:p:240-248
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2012.06.016
    Contact details of provider: Web page:

    Order Information: Postal:

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Noreen McDonald, 2008. "Children’s mode choice for the school trip: the role of distance and school location in walking to school," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 23-35, January.
    2. McMillan, Tracy & Day, Kristen & Boarnet, Marlon & Alfonzo, Mariela & Anderson, Craig, 2006. "Johnny Walks to School - Does Jane? Sex Differences in Children's Active Travel to School," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt22f7k6z8, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Colin Black & Alan Collins & Martin Snell, 2001. "Encouraging Walking: The Case of Journey-to-school Trips in Compact Urban Areas," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 38(7), pages 1121-1141, June.
    4. Yeung, Jennifer & Wearing, Scott & Hills, Andrew P., 2008. "Child transport practices and perceived barriers in active commuting to school," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 895-900, July.
    5. McMillan, Tracy E., 2007. "The relative influence of urban form on a child's travel mode to school," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 69-79, January.
    6. Amith Yarlagadda & Sivaramakrishnan Srinivasan, 2008. "Modeling children’s school travel mode and parental escort decisions," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 201-218, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:24:y:2012:i:c:p:240-248. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shamier, Wendy)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.