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The effects of rational and habitual factors on mode choice behaviors in a motorcycle-dependent region: Evidence from Taiwan

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  • Chen, Ching-Fu
  • Lai, Wen-Tai

Abstract

This paper aims to explore the effects of rational and habitual factors on mode choice behaviors in a motorcycle-dependent region. Both a discrete choice model and theory of planned behavior (TPB) are employed to examine mode choice behaviors. A sample was obtained from two major cities in Taiwan to examine the contextual effect of public transport development. The empirical results reveal that psychological (rational and habitual) factors have stronger influences on mode choice behaviors than socio-economic factors, and furthermore that habitual factors explain traveler mode choice behaviors better than rational ones. The contextual effect with regard to public transport development is found to be significant for motorcyclists' mode choice behaviors. The practical implications of the results of this study are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Ching-Fu & Lai, Wen-Tai, 2011. "The effects of rational and habitual factors on mode choice behaviors in a motorcycle-dependent region: Evidence from Taiwan," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 711-718, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:18:y:2011:i:5:p:711-718
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cristian Domarchi & Alejandro Tudela & Angélica González, 2008. "Effect of attitudes, habit and affective appraisal on mode choice: an application to university workers," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(5), pages 585-599, August.
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    5. Tommy Gärling & Kay Axhausen, 2003. "Introduction: Habitual travel choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 1-11, February.
    6. John Thøgersen & Berit Møller, 2008. "Breaking car use habits: The effectiveness of a free one-month travelcard," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 329-345, May.
    7. Sebastian Bamberg & Daniel Rölle & Christoph Weber, 2003. "Does habitual car use not lead to more resistance to change of travel mode?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 97-108, February.
    8. Daniel McFadden & Kenneth Train, 2000. "Mixed MNL models for discrete response," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(5), pages 447-470.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jariyasunant, Jerald & Abou-Zeid, Maya & Carrel, Andre & Ekambaram, Venkatesan & Gaker, David & Sengupta, Raja & Walker, Joan L., 2013. "Quantified Traveler: Travel Feedback Meets the Cloud to Change Behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2dh952gj, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Hagen, Jonas Xaver & Pardo, CarlosFelipe & Valente, Johanna Burbano, 2016. "Motivations for motorcycle use for Urban travel in Latin America: A qualitative study," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 93-104.
    3. repec:kap:transp:v:44:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11116-015-9672-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Habibian, Meeghat & Kermanshah, Mohammad, 2013. "Coping with congestion: Understanding the role of simultaneous transportation demand management policies on commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 229-237.
    5. Cass, Noel & Faulconbridge, James, 2016. "Commuting practices: New insights into modal shift from theories of social practice," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-14.
    6. Marquet, Oriol & Miralles-Guasch, Carme, 2016. "City of Motorcycles. On how objective and subjective factors are behind the rise of two-wheeled mobility in Barcelona," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 37-45.

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