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Walking down the habitual lane: analyzing path dependence effects of mode choice for social trips

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  • Sharmeen, Fariya
  • Timmermans, Harry

Abstract

In the field of transportation, several studies have researched commute mode choice and its dynamics in the short and in the long term. Relatively less is known about mode choice for discretionary and more flexible activities, such as social visits. These choices are dynamic and depend on personal habits and preferences, reflected to some extent in the history of similar choices. This study adopts the theory of path dependence to take life cycle dynamics and habitual preferences into account. Using a dataset collected in the Netherlands in 2011, a multinomial logit model of mode choice was developed. Results suggest that mode choices for social activities are path dependent, yet not entirely. There is also evidence of switching towards faster and more flexible modes after a life cycle event.

Suggested Citation

  • Sharmeen, Fariya & Timmermans, Harry, 2014. "Walking down the habitual lane: analyzing path dependence effects of mode choice for social trips," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 222-227.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jotrge:v:39:y:2014:i:c:p:222-227
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2014.07.012
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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0966692314001604
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. van den Berg, Pauline & Sharmeen, Fariya & Weijs-Perrée, Minou, 2017. "On the subjective quality of social Interactions: Influence of neighborhood walkability, social cohesion and mobility choices," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 309-319.
    2. Thorhauge, Mikkel & Swait, Joffre & Cherchi, Elisabetta, 2020. "The habit-driven life: Accounting for inertia in departure time choices for commuting trips," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 272-289.
    3. Abu Toasin Oakil & Dorien Manting & Hans Nijland, 2018. "The role of individual characteristics in car ownership shortly after relationship dissolution," Transportation, Springer, vol. 45(6), pages 1871-1882, November.
    4. Sotirios Thanos & Maria Kamargianni & Andreas Schäfer, 2018. "Car Travel Demand: Spillovers and Asymmetric Price Effects in a Spatial Setting," Transportation Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(3), pages 621-636, June.
    5. Donggen Wang & Tao Lin, 2019. "Built environment, travel behavior, and residential self-selection: a study based on panel data from Beijing, China," Transportation, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 51-74, February.

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