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An analysis of the dynamics of activity and travel needs in response to social network evolution and life-cycle events: A structural equation model

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  • Sharmeen, Fariya
  • Arentze, Theo
  • Timmermans, Harry

Abstract

Several studies in transportation literature have shown that in the short-term social networks play an important role in discretionary activity and travel decisions of an individual. However, social networks may not remain unchanged in the long term, particularly in response to life-cycle events (for instance, an employment transition). A change in the social network in turn may have a repercussion on activity and travel behaviour, indicating that an investigation of the long term dynamics of social networks are relevant for understanding activity scheduling, or rescheduling behaviour. To this end, the paper advances the concept of social network dynamics in dynamic activity travel behaviour modelling. It explores the dynamics of social networks and life-cycle events, and their influence on activity and travel needs. Dynamics are assumed to be triggered by life-cycle events. For the purpose of the study an event-based retrospective survey was conducted in 2011 in the Netherlands. A structural equation model was developed to elicit activity and travel needs and their dependencies on life-cycle and social network dynamics. The estimated model takes history dependence of activity and travel needs into account. Results suggest that activity and travel dynamics are influenced by life-cycle and social network dynamics. Moreover social network and activity travel dynamics were found to be interdependent (i.e. a change in one leads to change in the other). Furthermore, the study results confirm the general assumption that travel needs are for the most part influenced by activity needs. The paper concludes that the theory and modelling framework of travel behaviour dynamics should take the dynamics of personal networks into account.

Suggested Citation

  • Sharmeen, Fariya & Arentze, Theo & Timmermans, Harry, 2014. "An analysis of the dynamics of activity and travel needs in response to social network evolution and life-cycle events: A structural equation model," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 159-171.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:59:y:2014:i:c:p:159-171
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2013.11.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sharmeen, Fariya & Arentze, Theo & Timmermans, Harry, 2014. "Dynamics of face-to-face social interaction frequency: role of accessibility, urbanization, changes in geographical distance and path dependence," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 211-220.
    2. Zhao, Pengjun & Zhang, Yixue, 2018. "Travel behaviour and life course: Examining changes in car use after residential relocation in Beijing," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 41-53.
    3. Rosa Arroyo & Lidón Mars & Tomás Ruiz, 2018. "Perceptions of Pedestrian and Cyclist Environments, Travel Behaviors, and Social Networks," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(9), pages 1-21, September.
    4. van den Berg, Pauline & Sharmeen, Fariya & Weijs-Perrée, Minou, 2017. "On the subjective quality of social Interactions: Influence of neighborhood walkability, social cohesion and mobility choices," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 309-319.
    5. Lin, Tao & Wang, Donggen & Zhou, Meng, 2018. "Residential relocation and changes in travel behavior: what is the role of social context change?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 360-374.
    6. Dekker, Thijs & Hess, Stephane & Arentze, Theo & Chorus, Caspar, 2014. "Incorporating needs-satisfaction in a discrete choice model of leisure activities," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 66-74.
    7. Yun Wang & Xuedong Yan & Yu Zhou & Qingwan Xue, 2017. "Influencing Mechanism of Potential Factors on Passengers’ Long-Distance Travel Mode Choices Based on Structural Equation Modeling," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(11), pages 1-22, October.
    8. Ulfarsson, Gudmundur F. & Steinbrenner, Anne & Valsson, Trausti & Kim, Sungyop, 2015. "Urban household travel behavior in a time of economic crisis: Changes in trip making and transit importance," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 68-75.
    9. Yu, Le & Xie, Binglei & Chan, Edwin H.W., 2019. "Exploring impacts of the built environment on transit travel: Distance, time and mode choice, for urban villages in Shenzhen, China," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 57-71.
    10. Müggenburg, Hannah & Busch-Geertsema, Annika & Lanzendorf, Martin, 2015. "Mobility biographies: A review of achievements and challenges of the mobility biographies approach and a framework for further research," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 151-163.
    11. Andre Carrel & Raja Sengupta & Joan L. Walker, 2017. "The San Francisco Travel Quality Study: tracking trials and tribulations of a transit taker," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(4), pages 643-679, July.
    12. La Paix Puello, Lissy & Chowdhury, Saidul & Geurs, Karst, 2019. "Using panel data for modelling duration dynamics of outdoor leisure activities," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 141-155.
    13. Sharmeen, Fariya & Timmermans, Harry, 2014. "Walking down the habitual lane: analyzing path dependence effects of mode choice for social trips," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 222-227.
    14. Feng, Xiangnan & Lu, Bin & Song, Xinyuan & Ma, Shuang, 2019. "Financial literacy and household finances: A Bayesian two-part latent variable modeling approach," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 119-137.
    15. Calastri, Chiara & Hess, Stephane & Daly, Andrew & Carrasco, Juan Antonio & Choudhury, Charisma, 2018. "Modelling the loss and retention of contacts in social networks: The role of dyad-level heterogeneity and tie strength," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 63-77.
    16. Lisa Döring & Maarten Kroesen & Christian Holz-Rau, 2019. "The role of parents’ mobility behavior for dynamics in car availability and commute mode use," Transportation, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 957-994, June.
    17. Albrecht, Janna & Holz-Rau, Christian & Scheiner, Joachim, 2017. "Life-course data reconstruction using complementary information taken from linked lives," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 308-318.
    18. Pan, Xiaofeng & Rasouli, Soora & Timmermans, Harry, 2019. "Modeling social influence using sequential stated adaptation experiments: A study of city trip itinerary choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 652-672.
    19. Qing-Chang Lu & Junyi Zhang & A. B. M. Sertajur Rahman, 2017. "The interrelationship between travel behavior and life choices in adapting to flood disasters," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 85(2), pages 1005-1022, January.
    20. van den Berg, Pauline & Weijs-Perrée, Minou & Arentze, Theo, 2018. "Dynamics in social activity-travel patterns: Analyzing the role of life-cycle events and path dependence in face-to-face and ICT-mediated social interactions," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 29-37.

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