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US immigrants and bicycling: Two-wheeled in Autopia

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  • Smart, Michael

Abstract

Immigrants to the United States--particularly new immigrants--are more likely than the native born to travel by bicycle. This paper explores the extent to which the use of bicycles by immigrants can be explained by variables such as income, age, automobile availability, and neighborhood characteristics. Results from multinomial logistic mode choice models suggest that, even after controlling for these factors, a large and significant "immigrant effect" remains. The effect size is large for all immigrant groups by sending country, though some immigrant groups--such as those from East and Southeast Asia--are more likely than are others to use bicycles after controlling for other factors. Several avenues for further research are introduced, and policy implications are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Smart, Michael, 2010. "US immigrants and bicycling: Two-wheeled in Autopia," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 153-159, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:17:y:2010:i:3:p:153-159
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blumenberg, Evelyn, 2009. "Moving In and Moving Around: Immigrants, Travel Behavior, and Implications for Transport Policy," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5b5329tk, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Jarad Beckman & Konstadinos Goulias, 2008. "Immigration, residential location, car ownership, and commuting behavior: a multivariate latent class analysis from California," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(5), pages 655-671, August.
    3. Cynthia Chen & Hongmian Gong & Robert Paaswell, 2008. "Role of the built environment on mode choice decisions: additional evidence on the impact of density," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 285-299, May.
    4. Satoshi Fujii & Ryuichi Kitamura, 2003. "What does a one-month free bus ticket do to habitual drivers? An experimental analysis of habit and attitude change," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 81-95, February.
    5. Tommy Gärling & Kay Axhausen, 2003. "Introduction: Habitual travel choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 1-11, February.
    6. Kristin Lovejoy & Susan Handy, 2008. "A case for measuring individuals’ access to private-vehicle travel as a matter of degrees: lessons from focus groups with Mexican immigrants in California," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(5), pages 601-612, August.
    7. Sebastian Bamberg & Daniel Rölle & Christoph Weber, 2003. "Does habitual car use not lead to more resistance to change of travel mode?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 97-108, February.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. U.S. Immigrants and Bicycling: Two-wheeled in Autopia
      by Sui-Jade in Journalist's Resource on 2010-06-30 02:01:08

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Smart, 2015. "A nationwide look at the immigrant neighborhood effect on travel mode choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 189-209, January.
    2. repec:eee:transa:v:106:y:2017:i:c:p:248-260 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Lanzendorf, Martin & Busch-Geertsema, Annika, 2014. "The cycling boom in large German cities—Empirical evidence for successful cycling campaigns," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 26-33.
    4. Pucher, John & Buehler, Ralph & Seinen, Mark, 2011. "Bicycling renaissance in North America? An update and re-appraisal of cycling trends and policies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 451-475, July.
    5. Daniel Chatman, 2014. "Explaining the “immigrant effect” on auto use: the influences of neighborhoods and preferences," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 441-461, May.
    6. Chatman, Daniel G. & Klein, Nicholas J., 2013. "Why do immigrants drive less? Confirmations, complications, and new hypotheses from a qualitative study in New Jersey, USA," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 336-344.

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